Windows Enterprise Desktop

Jun 12 2015   9:35AM GMT

Working Around Win10/8 Gotchas

Ed Tittel Ed Tittel Profile: Ed Tittel

Tags:
Troubleshooting
Windows 10
Windows 8

What with running two Win10 test machines — a desktop and tablet/convertible — I’ve been banging up against the limits of this new software from time to time, and have had to refurbish some troubleshooting skills. This was called to mind yesterday by two very nice bits of information I came across, each of which related to at least one of those gotchas that helped me formulated to the title for today’s blog post.

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When it comes to shooting trouble nothing beats good technique, except perhaps good automated tools.

Those two items are:

1. Sergey Tkachenko runs a small but potent Website called WinAero.com where he comments on Windows stuff, and publishes a wide variety of useful little Windows utilities and tools. Several of them, such as the Winaero WEI (Windows Experience Index, which brings the quick-n-dirty performance ranking back to Win 8 and 10 versions), have showed up in my own postings to this very blog. This particular item popped up a couple of days ago and is entitled “Change network location type (Public or Private) in Windows 10.” Apparently Sergey and I have often experienced the same problem, which is that after updates, between reboots, or upon waking from sleep Win10 often resets the network type from “Private” to “Public.” As he notes in this June 11 post, there actually is a way to get to this setting from the Network and Sharing Center. But it does require a reboot. I’ve found what I think is a simpler, if less direct method: I simply open Homegroup, which tells me that the network is the  wrong type to participate. Click Fix and it resets the network type to Private, after which I can again use RDP to remote into my test machines.

2. I subscribe to the great and informative Windows Secrets Newsletter for the princely sum of $15 a year. I like it so much, in fact, that I have it set up to bill my credit card annually for ongoing coverage. Longtime Windows maven Fred Langa has a piece in this week’s offering, also posted 6/11, entitled Free first aid for a wide range of Windows ills, wherein he reminded me of the many windows FixIt tools available and taught me about Microsoft’s Support Diagnostics Program (SDP) and the Microsoft Automated Troubleshooting Server (MATS), two programs about which I’d heard bits and pieces but had never bothered to dig into more deeply than hearsay would allow. What I discovered was a treasure trove of tools for detecting Windows ills, often with fixes to match, that address all kinds of problems from the merely persnickety to the downright catastrophic. Just for grins, I ran MATS on my production PC, and it seemed to chunk through its lengthy laundry list of checks without difficulty.

Always nice to find techniques for troubleshooting, but even better to gain access to good automated tools for that purpose. Thanks, guys!

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