Quality Assurance and Project Management

Mar 8 2015   12:07AM GMT

Five Learnings For Project Manager From Why Do Smart People Make Such Stupid Mistakes by Chris Merrington

Jaideep Khanduja Jaideep Khanduja Profile: Jaideep Khanduja

Tags:
book review
Contract negotiations
Project management
Project Manager

Why Do Smart People Make Such Stupid Mistakes: A Practical Negotiation Guide To More Profitable Client Relationship by Chris Merrington is quite relevant to project managers as negotiation is something that they need to do day in and day out with various stakeholders to keep their project stay healthy and running. Let us see as per the book, if project managers make such stupid mistakes in their routine professional life. There are total 11 chapters in this 207 pages book having quite interesting scenarios and anecdotes. The author is a known speaker, consultant and is the founder of a firm named Spring 80:20 that works in consulting and conducting workshops.

Some key learning for project managers from Why Do Smart People Make Such Stupid Mistakes: A Practical Negotiation Guide To More Profitable Client Relationship by Chris Merrington that I could chalk out are:

  • 1. Prepare well for all your negotiation meetings
  • 2. Don’t say “Yes” to everything that the client asks you to do. Be wise in making your final commitments. Don’t come under pressure of the client or become overwhelmed in grabbing the business. Identify your customers which are more troublemaking and asking for too much from you.
  • 3. Never be partial in your dealing with your customers and projects. Pay equal attention to all projects whether it has come from a customer of high potential or from a new entrant in the fray. Who known when the tables turn around and a low-profile customer becomes a high revenue customer?
  • 4. Don’t overload yourself with a lot of small projects. Also, take a note that don’t increase your team size for one-time kind of projects.
  • 5. Always under commit and over deliver rather than vice versa. Be clear in capturing exact requirements and delivering accordingly rather than wasting your energies on ambiguous and unclear requirements that will never get fulfilled.
  • It is a lot more to learn from this book for project managers though the book has not been specifically intended for them.

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