Open Source Insider

Nov 11 2010   10:28AM GMT

Apache issues war cry over Java Community Process

Adrian Bridgwater Adrian Bridgwater Profile: Adrian Bridgwater

Tags:
Apache
Java
JCP
Oracle

The Apache Software Foundation‘s (ASF) stance over its open source web server software and related projects is becoming heated. The ASF has reportedly issued a war cry in the form of an official threat to leave the Java Community Process (JCP) if Oracle acts like a corporate ‘pale face’ beast and refuses to treat it with the respect it deserves.

The Java Community Process describes itself as the mechanism for developing standard technical specifications for Java technology.

Java Community.png

Faced with the possibility of Oracle’s potential to jostle towards a more proprietary treatment of Java’s open source core, the official Apache Software Foundation blog made the following statement:

“The ASF will terminate its relationship with the JCP if our rights as implementers of Java specifications are not upheld by the JCP Executive Committee to the limits of the EC’s ability. The lack of active, strong and clear enforcement of those rights implies that the JSPA agreements are worthless, confirming that JCP specifications are nothing more than proprietary documentation.”

In return, Sun’s letter of intent reads as follows:

“In summary, Sun’s response is that some of Apache’s requirements are satisfied in the current draft, but others are not. Sun is proposing changes to the JSPA draft so that all of Apache’s requirements are satisfied, and with this note we convey the assurance that Sun’s interpretation of them satisfies Apache’s requirements. In what follows, we show how this is or will be made so, both in letter and in spirit.”

Don’t forget also that Oracle and IBM have said that they are collaborating to develop the OpenJDK reference implementation of Java:

“The Java community is vital to the evolution of the Java platform,” said Hasan Rizvi, senior vice president, Oracle. “The collaboration between Oracle and IBM builds on the success of OpenJDK as the primary development platform for Java SE.”

Watch this, and every other, space.

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