Microservices Matters

Nov 11 2014   8:35PM GMT

JBoss middleware and OpenShift unite with xPaaS offerings

Maxine Giza Maxine Giza Profile: Maxine Giza

Tags:
cloud
JBoss
middleware
OpenShift
PaaS
Red Hat

Integrating applications deployed in traditional enterprises or data centers with those in the cloud is a common headache enterprise architects face. Red Hat recently released OpenShift Enterprise 2.2 and new cloud services, JBoss Fuse for xPaaS (integration) and JBoss A-MQ for xPaaS (messaging) to make it easier for developers to update applications and integration platforms.

The cloud-based messaging tools aim to speed-up application development, particularly in organizations with a hybrid IT architecture. With it, enterprise customers can use PaaS for applications running in their own data centers and private clouds, according to Joe Fernandes, OpenShift director of product management.

We’ve all heard the terms iPaaS, IaaS, and SaaS, but what the heck is xPaaS? In short, xPaaS is a term Red Hat coined for uniting various integration and application-centric tools under one offering. “A lot of traditional middleware solutions are becoming available as a service,” noted Fernandes.

The new release of OpenShift Enterprise 2.2 with the addition of private iPaaS was done to help organizations with future development in mind. “It’s not traditional 2005 architecture,” said Pierre Fricke, director of product marketing for Red Hat JBoss Middleware. “It’s a 2015 type of architecture for microservices with a center piece around Apache Camel.”

Microservices are small, highly-distributed applications composed of logic and services that have to be connected and wired together, said Fernandes. “In many ways it’s the new SOA.”

Microservices were a hot topic at JavaOne 2014 this year. During that event, Java Champion and consultant Jeff Genender and developer Rob Terpilowski said that microservices offered a streamlined means of integrating cloud services.

Apache Camel brings standardized integration to the xPaaS offerings. “Camel actually implements the book that everyone uses, that makes it the closest thing to a standard for integration,” said Fricke. “It’s almost the de facto emerging standard for integration than anything else.”

Bridging the gap between development and operations to support applications is really where xPaaS comes in to play, according to Fernandes. “As you get in to enterprise application, inherently they tend to be more complex than some of the applications you see on the consumer side running in the public cloud today,” he said.

Some Fortune 1000 companies, such as statistic tools provider Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO) have already leveraged this Red Hat technology, Fernandes said. He noted, however, that xPaaS can be used by SMBs who need to reduce the amount of times it takes to develop and deploy applications.

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