Windows 2000 with two ethernet cards

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Networking
I have two ethernet cards on a pc. What do I need to do to run a Web browser(iexplorer) on each ethernet port one connected to DSL and the other to Cable. I need to do some testing running both at the same time. Any help would be appreciated
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I know you can under windows do load balancing, to how I do not know.

But I have a question for you. What are you trying to obtain out of this testing? To see which connection is faster?

If yes to Q2 then I would use one connection at a time.

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  • Netkey55
    you can't use 2 ethernet cards at the same time on 1 pc unless it is configured for ICS...but for your type of concern,it won't really be possible to run both dsl and cable at the same time...if you just want to check on the status of the network card, you can just check it on the properties under device manager(it should say "this device is working properly")and also you can type ping 127.0.0.1(when your on the command prompt)and if you received 4 "reply from" then there is definitely no problem with ur ethernet adapters...
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  • Bobkberg
    I beg to differ with the previous poster - it's quite possible - as long as you're viewing different web sites. Bottom line here is deliberate manipulation of the PC's routing tables - But it will be more difficult than it might seem, for reasons I'll explain. To force your PC to use multiple routes, you need to get to a command prompt and issue commands like the following: route add 192.168.2.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 CableIP METRIC 5 IF 2 route add 172.16.0.0 MASK 255.255.0.0 DSLIP METRIC 5 IF 1 (Note - both commands should be on one line. If you want these changes to be permanent, then preface the "add" command with -p to make the new route survive a reboot.) Now - as to why this is NOT a good idea - unless you like a lot of painful work. Many sites (Yahoo among them) rely on a company/technology called Akamai - which places servers - especially images, but not limited to that which are co-located at many, many ISP's and other Co-Location sites. These systems have their own IP address ranges (usually local to the site, but not always). If you're looking to measure speed or some other factor - BE AWARE that you will probably wind up comparing apples to oranges - or worse yet, fruit cocktail. This is because for any given site, you'll have to perform a lot of network "sniffing" to determine where each ISP (DSL vs. Cable) is getting it's Akamai download from. In addition to Akamai, there are other content acceleration companies/technologies - that may muddy your picture. But - it IS possible, just not a very good idea. Bob
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  • Howard2nd
    This has become a recurring question. Bob gave the best direct answer on how and why not. That said, what you are asking is about bridging two conections. The optimum solution, if what you want is increased upload capacity, buy better service. If what you want is 'fallover' connections then look at the 3rd party bridging routers. The logs from the router will do your testing for you. If what you want is better/faster web delivery then look at 'caching' solutions. A great man said, "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch." Networking proves that daily.
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  • Bronco003
    Thanks all. I just wanted to compare in my local the speed difference between DSL from Verizon and Cable from Comcast. It looks like I'll do it one at a time after listening to you guys.
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  • VampiressX
    I would have to agree if this was the original intent - to buy a better service. Either that or have the expertise to be able to terminate several services into the one router and configure them appropriately with routing protocols etc that support the medium. But I'm still not sure if the OP was enquiring about keeping the two links seperate (ergo bridging them into the computer) or actually looking to increase the bandwidth. In my experience, slamming two dsl's together just isn't pretty and will most likely slow the overall speed down. I can't imagine what it would be like trying to load balance over a DSL link and a cable link. Nightmare is the first word that comes to mind.
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  • Bronco003
    I was just trying to see which service would be faster and cheaper. Comcast service is fast when everything is working but then it slows way down. My pc is about 12 miles from a DSL switching station but in the last year they have added repeaters or something to be able to offer the service at that distance.
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