Upgrading network switch to 1000 mbps

50 pts.
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Switches
Currently, I have 48 ports used on a 10/100 switch on network. I would like to upgrade my switches to 10/1000. Will this effect how my infostructure is setup? Interms of wires and jacks on the wall. I do understand that my ethernet cards must be capable of 1000 mbps. We are upgrading all the ethernet controllers on the PC, do i need to upgarde any of my jacks on the wall or that will work. Should I upgarde to 2000 mbps which is newer. Any additional advice appriciated. Thanks,
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CAT5e is capable of running Gigabit ethernet (ran it just fine for the last 5 years), however it is sometimes considered best to have CAT6 ethernet cables.

As for upgrading higher, it’s cutting edge so the premium will be steep. If you need the speed for your applications you may want to consider it– however, it’s doubtful you’ll need it everywhere. Upgrading your switches in the NOC to support the higher than Gigabit speed will likely get you in teh door if you need the speed.

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  • OMAR
    Does it really worth it to upgrade from Cat 5E to Cat 6? my only concern was my data transfer rate seems to be slow, since it's a graphic and video department involved. Some times it takes long to open a file over the network and quicker when it's local under 10/100 LAN. Thank you,
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  • Tbitner
    Officially you should use CAT6 for gig but you can get away with CAT5e. My company's Gigabit upgrade made a huge difference for backups and file transfers and I still use a lot of CAT5e. Just be aware that if's someone is complaining of slowness on gig, you might want to check the jacks and wiring to make sure they are certified for gig speeds.
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  • Snapper70
    What kind of distances are involved? You can probably "get away with" 5E on short distances IF it was well-engineered in the first place, but not if you're anywhere near the 100meter Ethernet limit. What you might want to try is to limit workstation connections to 100 Meg (possible on some switches) but enable server and "short" connections to be the full Gig - and THEN do a comparison to see if files really load that much faster; and if the upgrade of cabling is worth the disruption and expense.
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  • OMAR
    Hi guys, I really appreciate for your suggestions. The distances are less than 100meter. So basically what you are saying is people who don't use the server often or do heavy transfer to keep them on the 10/100 switch and people who do a lot of transfers like the video department to the server keep them on 100/1000 switches if they are less than 100meters. If I connect the server to the gig switch will that uplink to the 10/100 switch, so the light users can still have access to the server or everyone. Thank you
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  • Snapper70
    That's pretty much it. IF your 10/100 switch happens to have an uplink port that's capable of 1 Gig, that would be the next logical/highly preferable upgrade to do at the same time - so even those on the 10/100 switch are pretty much guaranteed a 100 Meg path (non-shared) back to the server.
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  • OMAR
    Basically, without any uplinks, can I put everyone on the 100/1000 gig switch? what is your suggestion on that. Should I keep them separately? for the 100mb speed gurantee? I didn't understand what you mean by if my 10/100 is capable of gig? The switches I have are ony 100/100 with standard uplink? is there 1000 up link? Thank you
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  • Snapper70
    If you CAN put all the users on the Gig switch, that's the best - I just thought you might have needed more ports. If you need the number of ports AND the 10/100 switch has a Gig uplink, then use that to link to the Gig switch, for the lower volume users. Actually, even if it doesn't, IF the duplex matches between the 10/100 and the Gig switch, you can still get 100 meg aggregate for all the 10/100 users, which will be more than enough for most mail/browsing/casual file access.
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  • Buddyfarr
    you can put everyone on the gig switch since all the users probably only have 100Mb cards anyway. just upgrade the heavy volume user's NICs to gig and that will speed them up. if low volume users have gig you might be able to use your browser to get into the config of the switch (if it's a managed switch), and limit them to 100Mb. if they are uploading to a server that is on your network then at least upgrade the NIC on the server to gig and that will speed up the network alone since everyone was sharing a 100Mb link to the server and now they are sharing a gig link to the server. You could also put a second gig NIC in the server and do load balancing on it.
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