Hacked email address?

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Email Address
Hacking
Security
I have received an email that appeared to be from me. On closer inspection the email address was my name but some bogus account at fluiddata. The problem however was that in the CC line were a number of my contacts from address book. So although emails are not being sent from my account, somehow this spammer has harvested my address book and is sending emails that 'appear to be from me'. Any thoughts about has happened and what I should do would be appreciated. Can't work it out.
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One way to fix this issue would be to change the password on your account so the hacker will have to get your new password. Make sure it’s the least thing the hacker would think it would be and try and put some strong malware software on your computer. Really strong malware software. Spybot Search and Destroy is a very good software, its made a name for itself over the years. It is effective and surely won’t infect your computer. Compaitable with every windows dating back to Windows 95. So you most definately be fine.

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  • TheRealRaven
    On closer inspection the email address...

    Email address? What email address? What "inspection" did you do?
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  • Kevin Beaver
    It sounds like that someone has possibly compromised your email login credentials or, perhaps, your computer is infected with malware. Have you gone down the path of resetting your password(s) and checking - and double checking - for such an infection?
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  • ToddN2000
    If you have access to another clean PC get in and change you passwords to ALL of your accounts. You may have been hit with some spyware/malware. Once your passwords are changes go back to your "infected" PC and run some anti-virus software.
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  • ToddN2000
    Sounds like you have some spyware/malware. If you have access to another clean computer,change all of you passwords there. Then go back to your "infected" PC and run some anti-virus software. Are you running any anti-virus now and if so how often?
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  • ToddN2000
    Sorry for double post. Replies got caught in the sites filter for some reason.
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  • Cheeseballs
    thanks guys. I changed my email passwords and ran anti virus. By closer inspection I meant that in the email to me it had my name. However, after clicking on it I saw it was not my email address. The addresses however were from my address book ( some not all). So was unsure what was going on. If they compromised my account why not use my email to do it or better yet not send it to me and alert me of what was going on. Apart from changing passwords and anti virus tests not sure what else I can do. I just wondered what had happened. Thank you for all your replies.
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  • Cheeseballs
    By addresses from my address book I meant they were in the cc line. so these people would think it came from me ( same name) unless they clicked on my name and saw that it was not my email address ( thus encouraging them presumably to open it). Thanks again

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  • TheRealRaven
    That's why I asked my first questions. There's no clear indication that your account was 'hacked' in any way, and it's not even clear if your address book was somehow ever compromised.

    It could be more likely that someone close to you (close friend, co-worker, relative) had malware that pulled from their address book and sent the e-mail using your name. Your name would have been picked at random from that address book.

    Lots of addresses could be duplicated simply because the two of you had acquaintances in common or you (or someone else) exchanged e-mails with various addresses in the Cc: lists. Those addresses could be automatically collected and stored in the compromised address book. Because various addresses were not known to you, we can guess that they weren't from your account.

    This is a fairly common happening.

    Nothing you can do about it other than keep yourself safe with safe practices, up-to-date AV, up-to-date patches for your OS and your apps, up-to-date anti-malware -- all the regularly recommended items.
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  • ToddN2000
    It is also possible that someone you correspond with has been hacked. It's using their address book and sending you e-mails. If you know the address it came from, notify them that they may have been breached. I've seen this a few times, I've got email form friends and family members when I know by the time it could not have been them. I just delete them and will ask the to send again if it was legitimate. This is a good example of how systems can be compromised. You think it's a safe email to open, when it's not.
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  • Cheeseballs
    I take your point therealraven and ToddN2000, its just that one of the addresses was quite specific to me ( I damaged my car and insurance wouldn't pay out. I had to deal with an Ombudsman with unusual name...unlikely any of my friends would have corresponded with that individual.) As for originating email adddress, it was something called @fluidata.co.uk... I'm unfamilair with it. Anyhoo, once again thank you  guys for all you help. 
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  • Re2010
    Is this your private email or are you part of a domain and using a product such as exchange?
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  • TheRealRaven
    It's irrelevant if it was you or some one else. And there's plausible reason to think that associates of any reasonable closeness could have contacts with the same insurance company and/or ombudsman over some unknown number of years.

    But again, it's completely irrelevant. The same things would be done either way. The same things that have been given for the past couple decades about password management, about installing and updating AV/anti-malware, staying current on OS and app patches, safe surfing, safe e-mail handling, etc., all are appropriate no matter which way it is.

    Nothing is different.
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  • Cheeseballs

    I agree therealraven and I have implemented those security measures. I was just interested to know the route of infiltration i.e. whether my email had been hacked or if it was malware harvesting email addresses from other external sources etc. I take your point about using same insurance company but this individual ombudsman resigned during the course of the investigation ( which took a year). I was referred to another. Also, as she had only been with the company for a short time prior to that I think its unlikely colleagues or associates had dealt with her in the context of her employment with that company. But you're right, nothing is different and I have implemented security measures. I'm nor disputing your advice. Like I said, I just wanted to know the route of infection for my personal curiosity. I accept however that I may never know,

    Re2010 I use Yahoo if that means anything.

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  • Cheeseballs
    Wondering if anyone can help. As you know my address book was hacked and my contact list started receiving spam from someone who spoofed my email address ( the @ bit is not right). I changed password, ran scan etc. However, I am still receiving spam. Is this something to be worried about or is it because they already have my address list and there is nothing I can do to stop it now ( the email is not coming from my account).
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  • ToddN2000
    You could always just flag to block the domain as spam if it's always the same.
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  • Cheeseballs
    different email addresses each time...ip shows its coming out of caucasus, Russian federation. It is going to spam folder in my account but not for others on contact list unfortunately. Thanks for the response ToddN2000.
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  • TheRealRaven
    Unfortunately, there is practically nothing you can do. There are a couple impractical things.

    For example, you might send a warning note to everyone that is on the To: and Cc: lists and say to ignore anything with your name and incorrect e-mail address. It possibly won't make any difference.

    In theory, you can also send complaints to whatever the 'Abuse' contact is for the offending domain, as well as possible up-lines. That's also unlikely to make any difference even though it is technically one thing you "should" do. Whether or not it's a good idea to send e-mail with your actual e-mail address to any of them...?
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  • Cheeseballs
    Thanks TheRealRaven, one friend has already given me a heads up about the rogue emails. Thankfully, friends seem to be fairly astute at spotting the fraudulent emails. So, I think ill probably cross fingers and hope with lack of clicking on active links will encourage the spammers to move onto to something else. Thanks for all your help.
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  • TheRealRaven
    It pretty much happens to all of us. I got my first e-mail from "myself" quite a few years ago. That problem disappeared on its own soon after; perhaps because it was obvious to all recipients that it couldn't really be from me.
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