Hacked Android Galaxy Phone & Verizon Ellipsis 8

55 pts.
Tags:
Android
Mobile security
Security
I believe that I've been experiencing targeted bullying and hacking for the past year. I believe that a laptop and another computer may have had a keylogger installed that seems to have avoided detection by AVG and Malwarebytes updates/scans. On my Android Galaxy phone I installed an app that monitors the IP addresses that access the phone. There were several strange IP addresses/google maps hiding under different apps. I even believe an Android device from outside the country was synced up to my phone. I've asked another person to install the app on his phone and nothing of the sort was found-- just regular looking Google addresses in California. For example, Malwarebytes on the infected phone will show a long, strange IP address with letters and colons and with the location in a European country. I have pics and videos of these incidents . What I need is to find more technological evidence. There also has been more than one hack attempts on a couple email accounts; one was literally attempted shortly after I created it.  There has been many suggestions that say that the hack is complicated and could include an older blackberry. It would be a lot easier if I could get a scan of some sort, checking all the devices I have concerns about and finding out if there is proof of hacking then going over a year of strange explanations. Is there a way that someone could help me? I would greatly appreciate it.
0

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

Discuss This Question: 11  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.
  • TheRealRaven
    There are far more "long, strange IP address[es] with letters and colons and with the location in a European country" than all of the IP addresses in the entire world that have no letters or colons put together. IPv6 addresses have "letters and colons" while IPv4 addresses don't, and IPv6 address space dwarfs IPv4.

    Many (most?) e-mail addresses, as well as many (most?) devices, have attempted hacks shortly after connection to the Internet. That's currently just a fact of life. Nearly all of the attempts are invisible to most of us, but the attempts are generally unending.

    The only thing you're likely to accomplish is that the (possibly thousands of) attempts are made visible to you. Day after day.

    You can, of course, engage a qualified technician or a professional to perform a detailed analysis. The trouble is that few people want the potential expense and choose instead to search for (non-exi8stent) methods of getting it done without the necessary effort in studies of all of the related technologies.

    Simply put, it's not simple. If it was, we wouldn't see intrusions into health care providers, major retailers, government agencies, etc., that can afford staffs of experts.

    The best advice today for non-technical users is the same advice that's been posted many times in the years since the public began using the Internet and its varied facilities. Examples are:
    • Choose strong passwords.
    • Visit only trusted sites with valid security certificates.
    • Avoid porn websites.
    • Be very careful when asked to fill out personal information, like credit card account numbers.
    • Do not give out personal details to strangers.
    • Limit the information you share on social media.
    • Clear your browser cache every now and then.
    • Be careful when using download managers.
    • Never disclose your password to important or private Internet accounts to anyone.
    • Always remember to log out of important accounts like e-mail, forums, or social network sites.
    • Be careful when using removable writable media.
    • If you can afford it, use a reputable anti-virus software package.
    • If you cannot afford proprietary anti-virus software packages, some freeware packages work quite well.
    • Also have an anti-spyware program, and a firewall.
    • Secure your wireless router.
    • Do not open an e-mail attachment if you are not absolutely sure what it contains.
    • Don't fall prey to phishing scams.
    • Keep your eyes peeled for online scams.
    • Run a full system scan every month.
    • Be careful when installing programs or agreeing to terms.
    • Turn off file sharing and network discovery when using a public wireless network.
    • Always check for secure transaction info.
    • Never click on pop ups that are ads.
    • Keep a backup of important emails and documents on a USB flash drive, in print, or both.
    • Set your browser to warn you when a cookie is installed.
    • Use a plain text email display instead of HTML email so that tracking files and cookies cannot be included in email files.
    • And more...
    Many of those can take deeper explanation and experience, but if they're too difficult as they are, they should illustrate the magnitude of learning details that may take years to get through. (It takes even longer through a public Q & A forum.)

    There is no magic. It takes reading books, attending college-level classes, spending time with lab work and more.

    If better advice exists on-line, Google searches will find it. Or another member will post a link (that you'll have to follow at your own risk).
    36,880 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Subhendu Sen
    It is also necessary to change password time to time, although you choose a very strong password. Also anti virus updation/ latest patch is necessary either by auto or manual.
    142,210 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ToddN2000
    Nice post Raven. Let's hope people take your advice. Then maybe we would get a little more time for ourselves. I get tired of helping friends and family trouble shoot issues they could have prevented if they only listened.
    136,240 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GlowBug6
    Luckily enough for me, Todd, I have been able to think about changing my password several times. The issue is not just a constant bombardment. We believe that a program was installed on our computer. If they have a keylogger it doesn't matter how many times I change my password on there. And I have been using passwords with upper/ower, numbers, and symbols. I went to the library after I realized both our home computers appear to be compromised. I don't and won't email them to anyone. So if they installed a program on my computer that was undetected by AVG and Spybot could you tell me another possibility? As in, are there programs that once you get into someone's inbox there is no getting them out? Anything you think of would be helpful. Thanks. 

    55 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GlowBug6
    Raven,

    We believe this to be a targeted hack, not an unlucky click or gullible scam, or carelessness on our part. As I mentioned to Todd, I don't use "easy" passwords before and after I noticed why these bullies were able to have such insight.. I want to know if it is possible that someone went to a hacker and requested that a program to be installed that could be undetectable to AVG and Spybot. If the answer is "of course" I would like, in stead, a list of suggestions and how it can be fixed. We have installed a new anti-virus program that uses a sandbox-- can that be sidestepped? How? 

    As far as the Android goes, the suspicious locations would appear under different phone apps. Also one looks like an Andoird and notepad system is linked up to another phone and computer. Is that possible? Does that signify a cloud hack? is it a phone number hack? The unfortinate event of unknowingly accessing an infected email and it spreading? Please let me know which one is more feasible with your expertise.

    And I agree, if it was simple, I'm sure that a simple AVG/spybot scan would have found the offensive program and taken care of it. We do run scans more than once a month. 

    So let's say that either they purchased a spy software or hired a hacker to do so and you want to have full access to someone's Android/computer/tablet what would you do? 

    I'm in pursuit of knowledge from a "white hat" computer person. What qualifications would put a computer person as qualified? Any questions that you recommend me asking that person? 

    Thanks for anything you can give. I appreciate it. 
    55 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ToddN2000
    If you think you have a key logger, you need to change your passwords from a clean PC. Otherwise they will just get your new password, Then scan the infected devices. I have had luck with MWAV. It finds some that the others do not.
    136,240 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GlowBug6
    To clarify a comment I made: I believe a phone and computer from the netherlands is synced up to my android and tablet. 
    55 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GlowBug6
    Hi Todd, thanks for getting back to me so quickly. This has been a nightmare. I'll look into MWAV. Do you know if there could be something that could sit in my inbox once they have hacked it? I'm trying to think of anything...
    55 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ToddN2000
    The only safe thing is not to open any suspicious e-mails, which you probably already know. What program are you using for e-mail? Some services will let you scan an email before opening it for threats. If you think you phone has been synced, I would contact you carrier and see if they can trace it.
    136,240 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GlowBug6
    Oh... you know .. a little this and that. I use comcast, hotmail, gmail, and one yahoo, I think. Many accounts were created recently because I was trying to get away from them. Hotmail has shown one hack attempt, a couple more showed hack attempts- one each it seems. but my concern was if one attempt was enough and then they can squat. I'll call the phone company-- good point. :) Thanks... 
    55 pointsBadges:
    report
  • TheRealRaven
    There is nothing that can run from your Inbox unless you run it yourself. That is, there might be an email that has an attachment that looks like, say, a .PDF file. When you click on the attachment to open it, you cause it to run. But essentially any quality email like AVG is very likely to catch it.

    It's certainly possible for a "hacker" to infiltrate one of your devices, posibly even two different types of devices. But for someone to pay a high enough price to control both an Android device as well as a PC, the target would almost certainly need to be worth at least tens of thousands of dollars. If that much couldn't be extracted from the target, there'd be no point in the high price needed to get someone who could (1) control both while (2) effectively remaining invisible.

    And there would almost certainly be no point in maintaining ongoing control over any length of time after discovery because it would necessarily leave a trail back to the source.

    So, who do you know who's willing to spend many thousands of dollars just for bullying you?

    The degree of "hacking" that you describe is top-level stuff... unless someone regularly has physical access to the devices. If you've only installed Android apps from the Google Play store, you can effectively guarantee that your Android device has not been "hacked". OTOH, if you download and install from other sites, then it's anybody's guess what you have. You're the device owner; you can install anything you want, malware or otherwise and it's quite likely that anti-virus programs, etc., won't stop you from doing it.

    But to somehow manage to beat the extremely unlikely odds of installing any kind of related malware on two different types of devices? That stretches credulity to the limit. It'd be approaching impossible.

    You're not a multi-million (billion?) dollar financial institution, are you? Or an important foreign government agency?
    36,880 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following

Share this item with your network: