iSeries FTP Character change

5 pts.
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AS/400 FTP
iSeries
Sending a file from the iSeries box using FTP the file is being change from a bar to an exclamation mark. Why is this happening?
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  • TheRealRaven
    A somewhat simplified description is something like this:

    One (or both) of the two systems very likely is running with the QCCSID system value set as 65535. In addition, the two systems likely have workstation settings for different language IDs. The QLANGID, QCHRID, QCNTRYID, QSRTSEQ and possibly other system values can also have related effects; but QCCSID=65535 is one that is common.

    Because of QCCSID=65535, the transfer across a network connection was in binary mode rather than text mode. In binary mode, the bit patterns in each byte was the same on the receiving side as they were on the sending side. That's in a very strong sense what 'QCCSID=65535' means, i.e., "Do not do encoding conversion between systems."

    But because of different language IDs, the bit pattern for the vertical-bar character on the source system is interpreted as an exclamation point when displayed on a workstation session on the receiving system. The two language IDs represent two slightly different 'alphabets'.

    For CCSID 37 and UK or US English (and a few others), a hex value of x'4F' is the vertical-bar. In CCSID 500, x'4F' is the exclamation point. If x'4F' is transferred between two systems without translating the encoding, and users view the same data on the two systems under different job CCSIDs, their sessions can display different characters.

    It's because one (or both) of the systems has been configured not to translate between the two alphabets. The systems and workstation sessions are working according to how they are configured.

    In general, a QCCSID system value of 65535 can work okay as long as the system's data isn't transferred across a network, including to PCs. Once network translation is important, QCCSID becomes very important.

    It's also possible to set more specific encoding for particular jobs though it gets tricky predicting when it's needed.

    Ideally, system values should be set appropriately when a system is first installed. There can be problems with data translation if QCCSID is changed after the system has been working for a while. It's best to contact IBM Support and ask for any testing guidelines and documentation before making changes. Objects and data that have been created can return unintended values under a few circumstances, especially if different users have different language settings.
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  • azohawk
    Thank you Raven for the explenation. When I read the question, I suspected CCSID issue. Your explenation not only confirmed what I suspected, but gave me a better understanding of why it was so.
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