DSL when the power goes out

5 pts.
Tags:
DSL
ISP
I've been getting different answers to this from friends and supposed pros: I have DSL, via my AT&T landline, from another ISP provider, using my own DSL modem (with only a hard connection, i.e., it's not a Wi-Fi modem, as I didn't want one).  If the power goes out 'locally', e.g., my neighborhood only, i.e., not affecting the local AT&T central office from which the DSL line comes (originally from my ISP), and if I have attach a battery to provide appropriate DC voltage/amperage directly to my DSL modem (until the power comes back on to power it--by the way, I have a laptop which has batteries, so I don't have to worry about that being powered for a few hours), and, supposing that there is nothing else wrong with my land line from AT&T, i.e., I can still make/receive voice calls, then can I expect that I'll still be able to access the Internet via my DSL over the land line, or does somehow (how I can't imagine) the DSL go away (so I can't resync the modem after connecting the battery when the power goes out) even though I've power to the modem again now and an active voice capability on my land line. Again, I ask this because my ISP (whom I pay for the DSL line) says I should be able to use DSL under these circumstances, but a friend in another part of the county, who uses the same ISP for his DSL and even has the same model of modem, who powered his modem when his power went out once, says he could talk on his line but could NOT use his DSL. Thanks for the help! - Jay


Software/Hardware used:
just a Toshiba laptop and an Actiontec modem (doesn't take a battery, so I'd need to buy one and somehow adjust for the proper voltage/amperage)
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  • ToddN2000
    I know your land line will work if there is no power as long as it's not a cordless phone. The base unit still needs power. I believe you are correct that is should still work. Land lines provide their own power. It may be possible that the power only covers the voice wires and not all wires in the phone cord. You could try unplugging your modem so it work on the battery and test your theory. I'd be curious to the results.
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  • LowellVanskike
    For your info; In DSL mode the two voice wires serve a dual purpose, both voice and DS;. DSL in digital mode superimposed on voice in analog mode. At the same time, the wire pair carries the DC to operate the phone. Thats why, in my case, I'm surprised that DSL was operational with a shorted pair at the lightening protector.

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  • TheRealRaven
    It's not necessarily true that DSL requires two wires. Symmetric DSL (SDSL) is one example that only needs one wire.
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  • LowellVanskike
    That's probably why my DSL continued to function on a shorted pair. Meaning I probably have SDSL, as you suggest. Thanks for the info.
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  • TheRealRaven
    There are numerous possibilities, but we'd need access to the physical site to make any valid determination, as well as needing to ask your ISP about details of the DSL line to their center..

    But it's not clear what your question is.

    Are you asking if it's possible to do at your location? Or did you try it and it didn't work and you want to know why not? Or it worked and you want to know why? Or something else?
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