Head in the Clouds: SaaS, PaaS, and Cloud Strategy

Jun 26 2015   12:01PM GMT

Red Hat’s OpenShift Enterprise 3 PaaS gets a formal launch

Joel Shore Joel Shore Profile: Joel Shore

Tags:
OpenShift
PaaS
Red Hat
Web Application devlopment

Stand in any hallway during the Red Hat Summit in Boston this week, and you were likely to hear the c-word. Containers. And the d-word, too. Docker. Those two words seemed to get people more revved up than the energy drinks I saw being consumed everywhere, too. (The p-word, Python, wasn’t that far behind.) None of this is lost on Red Hat, of course. The company responded with its big announcement of general availability for OpenShift Enterprise 3, its enterprise-ready Web-scale container private PaaS. It’s based on Docker format Linux containers, Kubernetes orchestration, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, providing full support from the operating system to application runtimes. (Version 7.2 of Enterprise Linux is not too far away.)

Of the three flavors Red Hat offers for OpenShift, this is the one that changes the least and is likely the logical choice for corporate cloud app development. OpenShift Origin, the free community PaaS is where changes and updates first get posted, and that can be dozens over the course of a month. Though it’s a great way to get started, it’s ultimately not where businesses will want to be. In the middle is OpenShift Online, operated and supported by Red Hat in the public cloud.

So what is Red Hat doing in OpenShift Enterprise 3? It delivers a container-based application platform based on Docker and powered by Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The idea is to provide a secure, efficient, and portable way to develop, deploy and run application services. OpenShift users also get access to a pretty big ecosystem of vetted, secure packaged application components, thanks to Red Hat’s Container Certification Program.

OpenShift Enterprise 3 includes the Kubernetes the open source, container orchestration and management engine developed with Google. What’s interesting is that with Red Hat as a contributor to both the Docker and Kubernetes open source projects, it’s eating its own dog food.

After sitting through more than a half-dozen one-hour sessions over two days, OpenShift was right at the top of those hallway conversations.

Shawn Zamacheck, a research developer at the Wharton School in Philadelphia is a fan, and a user. He uses OpenShift for creating research surveys. He looked at competing PaaS offerings, including Heroku. AWS didn’t have anything suitable a couple of years ago when he was looking around. He settled on Red Hat mainly because it was stable and supported a wide swatch of technologies.

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