Writing for Business - A Whatis.com Blog

Dec 6 2012   11:35AM GMT

‘Tis the season or t’is the season?

Ivy Wigmore Ivy Wigmore Profile: Ivy Wigmore

 

Which is correct?
Be careful shopping online: According to security experts, ____ the season for identity theft.
a. ’tis
b. t’is


Answer: a.

Explanation:
‘Tis is a contraction of it is. The rule with contractions is that we put the apostrophes where the letters are missing.

See The Oatmeal for the word on apostrophes, bacon hats and lightning pants.

Follow me on Twitter @tao_of_grammar

16  Comments on this Post

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when other members comment.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • ghrank6
    Your answer ignores the capitalization of the T. If you spelled it out whole it would be "It is" but using the contraction makes the first visible letter the second letter of the word. How do you capitalize an apostrophe?
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • murcam49
    How about if the apostrophe is taking the place of "his", as in "This is", so "T'is" would be correct?
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • deanmac
    Grammar police vs Typography police. Need to also watch the direction of the curved quote marks. In my opinion, you have it correct in the answer (a), but incorrect in the headline. My reasoning: no matter where you locate it, it is an apostrophe, not a single-opening-quote-mark.
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • svenpo
    @murcam49
    T'is Is not a standard english (and I mean British English) is not a standard contraction. 'tis is a standard contraction.
    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%27tis
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/%27tis
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/tis?q=%27tis
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/secondary/ox_dict_writers_editors/%27tis?searchDictCode=all
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • svenpo
    @deanmac
    You are correct. The apostrophe should always hook down and to the left.The mark in the heading is a secondary open quote mark.
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • epmanwest
    I don't know how I ended up here from Google but wow, some people either have too much time on their hands or are just geared towards an anal life style.  And not the good type of anal either.  'Tis a waste of my time.
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • jklntx
    Then why did you waste your valuable time reading and going further by answering.?
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ShirleyGBA
    'r is should be the proper way to write the contraction for `it is'. Do not use a capital `t' for the beginning of the word `it'. How do you like them apples?
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ShirleyGBA
    Ooops. I started off my comment with the letter `r' instead of `t'. Sorry.
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • GHST415150
    ......0_o
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • drdeb93
    What about "this is">>t'is ?
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • deanmac
    Thank you, Ivy, for writing the original post. I found your post, searching to double-check what I thought was the answer to the question about ’Tis. Funny, the people that find a post like this, then can do nothing but show disrespect. It's not being anal, it's trying to be correct; in my case, for an advertisement for a client. (Maybe that is the definition of being anal, but it's important as a professional writer to be correct.)

    To the people who still want to question your answer of where to locate the apostrophe: you bring up a good question to think that it might be a contraction of "THIS" rather than "IT IS," but in almost every reference I located it says ’TIS refers to "IT IS".

    In most examples of the contraction, "IT IS" seems to make more sense than "THIS IS". Think about "My country, ’tis of thee . . ."

    ghrank6, your statement that Ivy ignores the capitalization of the T is an interesting detail, but to me, your question, how do you capitalize an apostrophe, is the answer. You don't. So if the contraction ’tis begins the sentence, you would capitalize the T. I could be wrong.
    20 pointsBadges:
    report
  • mememememememe
    Thanks to u now whenever i use the " ' " i think of u and the fascinating history of the ampersand. i can't help but smile and laugh.

    by the way i've been having fun with humor-including somewhat inappropriate humor- to help myself and others "be in the present." ( which is the hardest thing for humans to do.)

    Here's one for u. My dear friend told me he was going to have a threesome last night but two people didn't show up.


    70 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ddriver
    epmanwest 'tis the anal one.
    10 pointsBadges:
    report
  • AndreaF
    Interesting scenario - I had to drop in for a read, because I honestly could not answer this - and I generally pride myself on grammatical matters. Some of the comments were also interesting, although I agree with jklntx.
    8,760 pointsBadges:
    report
  • mememememememe
    god bless you and god bless me. 'tis true that relationships are very challenging for me
    70 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

Share this item with your network: