Windows Enterprise Desktop

Dec 7 2011   3:44PM GMT

Windows 8 Folds Upgrade Advisor into OS Install



Posted by: Ed Tittel
Tags:
Windows 8 offers substantial set-up changes and improvements
Windows 8 setup is faster and easer for clean installs and upgrades

OK, I cheerfully confess that I glossed over the November 21 Building Windows 8 blog posting by Christa St. Pierre of the Windows 8 Setup and Deployment team, thinking that because I’ve gone through a couple of Windows 8 pre-release installs that I didn’t really need to read it from stem to stern. I was wrong, not because I had some experience and thus also, some appreciation for how it works and how it compares to Windows 7,  but because that decision to “just skip it” deprived me of some valuable background information and insight into how the Windows 8 install process has been redesigned. Perhaps I should have paid closer attention to that posting’s title: “Improving the setup experience.”

But thanks to Jon Brodkin over at Ars Technica (one of my favorite sources for inside information, insight, and breaking Windows news and rumors) I started to understand more about what was going on with this part of the Windows 8 experience. The title of his article, in fact, points to some incredibly salient points–namely “Windows 8 gets faster installation, 11-click upgrade for casual users.” So, plowing through this piece I discovered information about how the Windows 8 process has been substantially streamlined so that what required multiple downloads and 4 programs to complete, and involved working through 60 screens of information, is now condensed into a single program that might require working only 11 screens. By itself, that’s pretty remarkable (and this is coming from somebody who’s had to write up detailed install descriptions and instructions for every version of Windows since 3.1 way back in the mid-1990s).

There’s also a fascinating discuss of the upgrade process (Windows 7 to Windows 8, in this case) that explains how the number of files and applications installed can affect overall install completion time. Because Windows 7 stages files for upgrading, it ends up copying files twice during that process, even though the bulk of such moves start and end in the very same folder! Simply put, Windows 8 moves what it has to more expeditiously at the folder lever when moves are required, skips unnecessary moves, and uses hard links to move things logically in the file system without actually moving stuff around on disk. This cuts upgrade time for large complex installations from 188 minutes to 46 minutes on systems with 430K files and 90 apps (about a 75% improvement)  and from 513 minutes to 52 minutes on systems with 1.44M files and 120 apps (almost 90% better). Wow!

The blog goes on to explain how Web delivery has been optimized, through better compression, elimination of duplicate OS files, and smarter download behaviors. It closes with a nice overview of the Windows 8 ADK (Assessment and Deployment Kit, which replaces the old Windows Automated Installation Kit or WAIK), along with some best practices info on building Answer Files to automate bulk and remote installs.

This post is definitely worth reading, and pondering carefully, as you start thinking about test lab, pilot, and ultimately, production roll-outs of Windows 8. Be sure to check it out!

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