Windows Enterprise Desktop

Jan 7 2013   4:43PM GMT

CES Offers Interesting Windows 8 Add-ons and Platforms

Ed Tittel Ed Tittel Profile: Ed Tittel

Adding touch to Win8 remains a key (and often missing) ingredient.

Adding touch to Win8 remains a key (and often missing) ingredient.
Image credit: Vectorform Labs

With the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) now underway in Las Vegas, all kinds of vendors are offering up interesting Windows 8 add-ons and platforms. Though this exposition clearly aims at consumers, interesting items that could also be of interest to corporate or enterprise technology buyers (and users) are popping up, and will probably continue to do so all week long (CES runs through Friday, January 11). In perusing announcements and debuts already streaming out of this year’s CES, I’ve already seen these following items of potential interest:

  • A 13.3″ mobile add-on touch monitor from Lenovo called the ThinkVision LT1423p with 10-point touch ($349 for a wired version, $449 wireless) that includes a stylus, designed to bring touch access to Win8 for portable PCs that lack such capability.
  • A notebook/laptop/ultrabook add-on called the Targus Touch Pen that attaches a small receiver via USB to the side of a portable display and communicates with a soft-tipped stylus/pen to bring touch control to a non-touch display (works with displays up to 17″, and is said to cost “about $100“).
  • New touch-enabled notebook, ultrabook, and tablet PCs for Win 8 from lots of well-known players (such as Dell, Acer, Lenovo, Samsung, and others) and some lesser luminaries in that market space (Vizio has announced an 11.6″ tablet, LG also has one, and others are no doubt on the way) are sure to follow suit soon.

So far, I find the Targus Touch Pen to be extremely interesting because it essentially provides an easy and affordable way to retrofit touch onto existing notebook, laptop, and ultrabook PCs. Therefore, I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see Microsoft itself venture into this particular product space, because it’s clear they understand the benefits of adding touch to existing platforms (and already have two touch-sensitive mouse models, as well as a medium-sized trackpad, all of which work with Win8 to support gestures and its touch interface).

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