Virtualization Pro


August 18, 2008  8:10 PM

Splitting up clustered applications to virtualize certain apps



Posted by: Rich Brambley
Rich Brambley, Virtualization

How many administrators believe today that applications such as Microsoft Exchange, Citrix and Microsoft SQL are not good virtualization candidates?

More times than not, administrators that are reluctant to virtualize applications like these usually centralized their server infrastructure and are supporting large user bases accessing a load-balanced solution or a multi-node cluster. Thousands of mailboxes, hundreds of simultaneous sessions or concurrent job processing does not sound like a good fit for virtual machines at first glance, especially if you are only focused on migrating the current physical clustered configuration as is. Although possible to recreate as virtual machines, it is usually more complicated and therefore not desirable to attempt to P2V these configurations.

My opinion on this topic is that the advantages of virtual infrastructure sometimes warrant a redesign of the clustered service. In other words, consider changing the clustered design back into multiple stand alone virtual servers in order to leverage the unique virtualization features like live VM migration, distributed resource pooling, snapshots, and VM mobility. Let the virtualization hosts become the multiple nodes of your centralized model. If centralized user administration is the primary concern, then even though split into several VMs, all of your users, services and data are still under one roof, protected by the same UPS, and local to the same backup solution.

What about the potential for additional savings and efficiencies? We already know VI reduces power consumption, heat output, and takes up less rack space. You can go back to a Windows Standard version instead of an Enterprise or Data center edition. By eliminating the need for dedicated private heartbeat networks between the nodes you can reduce cabling and network ports. Administrative burden is reduced by doing away with cluster service accounts and specialized user and group permissions. Storage requirement complexity is minimized.

Finally, if concern for performance is the main barrier then consider the following. Even if you had a 1:1 consolidation ratio with an Exchange, SQL, or Citrix VM isolated on its own virtual host so it has exclusive access to physical resources, you still achieve most of the virtualization benefits discussed already.

The baselinemag.com article Virtualization Is the New Clustering by David Strom explores many of my points in greater detail and summarizes my opinions with the following quote:

“The combination of better resource use, reduced power and cooling in the data center, and more manageable applications delivery has made virtualization a very popular solution. As IT shops gain more expertise in delivering virtualized applications, they can also get a better handle on the kinds of load balancing and availability issues that once were the exclusive domain of clustering solutions.

“Indeed, virtualization continues to be complementary to—and is sometimes a less expensive replacement for—some applications that don’t require the up-to-the-nanosecond transaction-level failover that clustering provides. “

August 18, 2008  8:06 PM

Speaking of VMware license expirations – Workstation 6.5 development



Posted by: Rich Brambley
Rich Brambley, Virtualization, VMware Workstation

While the topic of VMware licenses expiring is fresh on everyone’s minds, the VMware Workstation 6.5 development process is an example of how product expirations are normally used to ensure customers are working from the latest supported product builds.

The blog post Workstation 6.5 beta – Release Candidate available on the Gabe’s Virtual World blog not only let me know VMware is getting closer to general availability with the latest Workstation release, but it also helps put VMware’s recent blunder into perspective. In short, Gabe posted because users of the Workstation 6.5 Beta 2 now have expired licenses that need to be upgraded for the new Release Candidate 1.

I’ve read several posts and comments over the last week stemming from the August 12 VMware ESX/ESXi Update 2 bug that expressed administrator outrage over the fact that VMware uses license expiration time bomb code in their products. Opinions ranged from “VMware is too concerned with protecting their software that it hurts it’s paying customers” to “product expiration code bugs are impossible to catch in the change control process so they should never be implemented.” I’m not arguing that either of these opinions is wrong or that VMware did not make a mistake, but time bomb licensing is a standard development practice. The primary purpose of the license expiration is to make sure all testers upgrade and VMware is not only supporting the latest version, but is getting technical feedback about the right code level. It was easy to lose sight of this during the frustration last week.

Let’s assume that VMware’s Quality Assurance and regression testing process doesn’t fail to remove or disable any license expiration code when Workstation 6.5 is finally generally available.

By the way, VMware Workstation 6.5 has some exciting new features. Go to the Workstation 6.5 Release Notes Page for more information.


August 13, 2008  2:50 PM

VMware releases emergency patch for ESX 3.5 Update 2 bug



Posted by: Eric Siebert
Eric Siebert, VMware ESX

VMware has announced the availability of a patch to fix the date bug that was reported earlier yesterday. They have also released a letter from their CEO, Paul Maritz, explaining the problem and apologizing for it. From VMware support:

Dear VMware Customer,

The express patches are now available for download that will resolve the ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 issue which causes the product license to expire as of August 12, 2008. Please go to http://www.vmware.com/go/esxexpresspatches for more information.

Thank You,
The VMware ESX Product Team

The express patch page displays the following information, be sure and carefully read through the KB articles that apply to either ESX or ESXi before download the new versions. The ESXi patch is about 204 MB in size and the ESX patch is 104 MB. The patches do not require a reboot of the ESX host but it must be in maintenance mode and all virtual machines must be shut down or moved to other hosts before it can be applied. The suggested steps for applying the patch as posted by one user in the VMTN forums are:

1) Turn off the NTP client on ESX 3.5 U2 server that you are going to VMotion VMs to

2) Make sure VM’s tools do not have time synchronization checked between the virtual machine and ESX server operation system

3) Change the date on ESX server that you are going to VMotion your VMs to

4) VMotion the VMs to the ESX server with the date changed

5) Apply the patch to the ESX 3.5 U2 server that the VMs have been moved off of

6) VMotion the VM’s back to the patched ESX 3.5 U2 server

7) Patch and change the date back on the other ESX 3.5 U2 server.

Express Patch Download
Special Notice: Please Read

An issue has been uncovered with ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 that causes the product license to expire on August 12, 2008.

Follow the steps below to correct this issue:

1. Read the following Knowledge Base articles first:
* Fix of virtual machine power on failure issue, refer to KB 1006716
* For VI 3.5, refer to KB 1006721 for deployment consideration and instruction
* For VI3.5i, refer to KB 1006670 for deployment consideration and instruction
2. Download and apply the express patch according to the product(s) you have:
* VMware ESXi 3.5 Update 2 Express Patch
* VMware ESX 3.5 Update 2 Express Patch

The full product downloads are still currently unavailable and are expected to be re-released as a new build number shortly.

Earlier VMware also released this update that provides some more information on the issue and answers to frequently asked questions.

Dear VMware Customers,

Please find the latest update about the product expiration issue. We are staging the express patches and expect it to complete in an hour. When the staging is done, we will send out a communication with more details.

Please see FAQ 1) for details about these express patches. In FAQ 2), we describe what upgrade media and update patch bundles to be release later are for. These are the updates since our last communication.

Complete information on the ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 issue follows:


*Problem:*
An issue has been discovered by many VMware customers and partners with ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 where Virtual Machines fail to power on or VMotion successfully. This problem began to occur on August 12, 2008 for customers that had upgraded to ESX 3.5 Update 2. The problem is caused by a build timeout that was mistakenly left enabled for the release build.

The following message is displayed in the vmware.log file for the virtual machine:

This product has expired. Be sure that your host machine’s date and time are set correctly.

There is a more recent version available at the VMware web site: http://www.vmware.com/info?id=4.
—–
Module License Power on failed.
*Affected Products:*
•- VMware ESX 3.5 Update 2 & ESXi 3.5 Update 2.
* – The problem will be seen ifESX350-200806201-UG is applied to a system.
* – No other VMware products are affected.

*What has been done?*
* – VMware removed the ESX 3.5 Update and ESXi 3.5 Update 2 binaries from the download pages in the evening of August 11, 2008 PST.
* – VMware Engineering teams have isolated the cause of the problem and are working around the clock to deliver updated builds and patches for impacted customers.
* – A Knowledgebase article has been published (http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1006716) and is being refreshed regularly.

*Resolution:*
VMware Engineering has produced express patches for impacted customers that will resolve the issue.

*FAQ:*
1. What will the express patches do?
There are two express patches: one for ESX 3.5 Update 2 and one for ESXi 3.5 Update 2. They are specifically targeted for customers who have installed or fully upgraded to ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 or who have applied the ESX350-200806201-UG patch to ESX/ESXi 3.5 or ESX/ESX 3.5 Update 1 hosts. For customers who haven’t done either, these express patches should not be applied.

To be noted is that these patches have been validated to work with esxupdate. However, testing with the VMware Update Manager is still under way. In subsequent communications, we will provide confirmation whether the patches work with VMware Update Manger or if a re-spin is required.
To apply the patches, no reboot of ESX/ESXi hosts is required. One can VMotion off running VMs, apply the patches and VMotion the VMs back. If VMotion capability is not available, VMs need to be powered off before the patches are applied and powered back on afterwards.

We are currently testing an option to apply the patch without requiring VMotion or VM power-off and re-power-on at the point of patch application. To immediately refresh vmx on the VM, one can VMotoin off running VMs, apply the patches and VMotion the VMs back. If VMotion capability is not available, VMs can be powered off before the patches are applied and powered back on afterwards.

2. When will VMware reissue the upgrade media and patch bundles?
VMware plans to reissue upgrade media by 6pm, August 13 PST and all update patch bundles later in the week. We will provide an ETA for the update patch bundles subsequently.\

NOTE:
* An upgrade media refers to ESX 3.5 Update 2 ISO, ESXi 3.5 Update 2 ISO, ESX 3.5 Update 2 upgrade tar and zip files. They are for customers who haven’t installed or upgraded to ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 but wish to.

* The “patch bundles” here refer to those released at GA. They are for customers who do not wish to do a full upgrade to ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2, but apply patches that are deemed necessary to hosts running ESX/ESXi 3.5 or ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 1. They are not the same as the express patch which is described above.

3. Why does VMware plan to reissue the upgrade media before the patch bundles?

Since we can complete building and testing of the upgrade media before the patch bundles, we want to make that available to customers right away instead of reissuing all the binaries later in the week.

4. Can VMware issue a patch that opens the licensing backdoor in the next hour as a critical measure?

There is no licensing backdoor in our code.

5. Does this issue affect VC 2.5 Update 2?

No.


August 12, 2008  7:16 PM

Latest update from VMware on the ESX 3.5 Update 2 bug



Posted by: Eric Siebert
Eric Siebert, VMware ESX

The below statement was made at 2:42PM EST by one of the VMware ESX product managers in the previously mentioned VMTN forum thread regarding the ESX 3.5 Update 2 bug that was discovered today.

Dear VMware Customers,

Please find the latest update about the product expiration issue. From this point on, we’ll provide an update every two hours.

Problem:

An issue has been discovered by many VMware customers and partners with ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 where Virtual Machines fail to power on or VMotion successfully. This problem began to occur on August 12, 2008 for customers that had upgraded to ESX 3.5 Update 2. The problem is caused by a build timeout that was mistakenly left enabled for the release build.

Affected Products:

* VMware ESX 3.5 Update 2 & ESXi 3.5 Update 2.

* Reports of problems with ESX 3.5 U1 with the following 3.5 Update 2 patches applied: ESX350-200806201-UG

* No other VMware products are affected.

What has been done?:

* Product and Web teams pulled the ESX 3.5 Update 2 bits from the download pages last night so no more customers will be able to download the broken build.

* VMware Engineering teams have isolated the cause of the problem and are working around the clock to deliver updated builds and patches for impacted customers.

* A Knowledgebase article has been published (http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1006716), but traffic to the knowledgebase is causing time outs. A new static page has been published at http://www.vmware.com/support/esx35u2_supportalert.html that customers and partners will be able to view.

* The phone system has been updated to advise customers of the problem

* Vmware partners have been notified of the issue.

Workarounds:

1) Do not install ESX 3.5 U2 if it has been downloaded from VMware’s website or elsewhere prior to August 12, 2008.

2) Set the host time to a date prior to August 12, 2008. This workaround has a number of very serious side affects that could impact product environments. Any Virtual Machines that sync time with the ESX host and serve time sensitive applications would be broken. These include, but are not limited to database servers, mail servers, & domain administration systems.

Next Steps:

VMware to notify customers who have downloaded this version and provide an update every two hours.

Resolution:

VMware Engineering has isolated the root cause and is working to produce an express patch for impacted customers today. The target timeframe is 6pm, August 12, 2008 PST.

FAQ:

* What would this express patch do?

More information will be provided in subsequent communication updates.

* Will VMware still reissue the upgrade media and patch bundles in the timeframe that has been communicated?

Yes. We still plan to reissue upgrade media by 6pm, August 13 PST (instead of noon, August 13 PST) and all update patch bundles later in the week. We will provide an ETA for the update patch bundles subsequently. NOTE: the “patch bundles” referred to here are for the patches listed above under “Affected Products” and the other bundles released at GA. They are not the same as the express patch which is targeted for 6pm, August 12, 2008 PST as stated above.
* Why does VMware plan to reissue the upgrade media before the patch bundles? That is a wrong priority call!

This is not a matter of priority. Since we can get done building and testing the upgrade media before the patch bundles, we want to make that available to customers first instead of reissuing all the binaries later in the week.
* Can VMware issue a patch that opens the licensing backdoor in the next hour as a critical measure?

There is no licensing backdoor in our code.

* Does this issue affect VC 2.5 Update 2?

No.

* What is VMware doing to make sure that the problem won’t happen again?

We are making improvements on all fronts. The product team had endeavored to deliver a release with support customers deem important. But we fell short and we are deeply sorry about all the disruption and inconveniences we have caused. We have identified where the holes are and they will be addressed to restore customers’ confidence.

The VMware ESX Product Team


August 12, 2008  1:50 PM

Critical ESX 3.5 Update 2 bug gives many users a nasty surprise



Posted by: Eric Siebert
Eric Siebert, VI3, Virtualization, VMware ESX

If you’ve upgraded to the latest release of ESX and ESXi which is version 3.5 Update 2, you might have woken up to a nasty surprise today. This thread in the VMTN forums has identified a major bug in the latest version of ESX that was released on 7/25/2008.

Users that have upgraded to this version have been reporting that they can no longer start or VMotion virtual machines running on ESX 3.5 Update 2 servers. Virtual machines that are already running are not effected by this bug. The error that is displayed in the VMware Infrastructure Client (VI Client) reports that a general system error has occurred. Going through the host log file displays the true error that the product has expired. The only known workaround at this point is to disable NTP on the ESX host if it is enabled and then set the ESX host server’s clock back to a date before 8/12/2008.

VMware support is aware of the issue as they are apparently getting swamped with calls because of it. A knowledgebase article has been posted confirming the bug and currently lists the resolution as:

The issue is found with ESX Server 3.5 U2, ESX Server 3i version 3.5 Update 2 Installable, and ESX Server 3i version 3.5 Update 2 Embedded. Currently there is no workaround for the issue and VMware engineering is actively working on resolving this issue. This KB article will be updated as soon as more information is available, check back frequently for updates and additions.

In addition this response from a VMware employee in the VMTN forum thread confirms that they are aware of the problem and will be issueing a fix soon:

An issue has been uncovered with ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2 that causes the product license to expire on August 12. VMware engineering has isolated the root cause of this issue and will reissue the various upgrade media including the ESX 3.5 Update 2 ISO, ESXi 3.5 Update 2 ISO, ESX 3.5 Update 2 upgrade tar and zip files in the next 36 hours (by noon, August 13, PST). They will be available from the page: http://www.vmware.com/download/vi. Until then, we advise against upgrading to ESX/ESXi 3.5 Update 2. The Update patch bundles will be released separately later in the week. The issue is being tracked on KB 1006716 on http://kb.vmware.com/ We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience that has been caused.

A response from another VMware employee also stressed the seriousness of the situation:

Everyone is mobilized here at VMware. mjlin, who posted in this thread several hours ago, is the product manager. Support knows what is going on. Someone else has posted our first communication here on this thread (patch should be available within 36 hours). I know we’re preparing additional communication, so check that kb and expect more from us as we have more information.

With a bug of this magnitude a critical fix will probably be released as soon as possible to resolve it. One could guess that this issue was caused by code that was put into the beta version that was set to expire on a certain date and was never removed for the final release. This is commonly done with beta software to ensure that nobody can use it past a certain date when the gold version has been released and is known as “time bombing.” Unfortunately for VMware the timing of this bug couldn’t be worse, they released ESXi for free with this version and many people downloaded it to try it out. Now those people will be receiving error messages that they may not understand and since there is no support for the free version of ESXi it could cause them to discontinue use of the product.

This is really a big black eye for VMware as they struggle to compete in a market that has become increasingly competitive lately. While VMware has been actively trying to release new features and versions as quickly as possible to try stay ahead of the competition, their product quality has not been what it used to be. Too many changes are being made to the product code and not enough testing is being done to ensure they release a quality product.

Until a fix is released it is advised that you disable the DRS feature and avoid using VMotion. If you must power on a virtual machine, you can disable the NTP service on your ESX host and set the clock back. Then watch for a fix to be released so you can apply it to all your ESX 3.5 Update 2 hosts.


August 11, 2008  1:59 PM

VMware working on patch for ESXi API exploit



Posted by: Akutz
Andrew Kutz, VI3, Virtualization, VMware ESX, VMware pricing, VMware scripting

Although VMware’s ESXi hypervisor is free under the VMware Infrastructure (VI) base license, it’s not without limitations.

Only some of the application programming interface (API) method calls that are typically shipped with the VI SDK are available. It’s impossible, for example, to power on and off a virtual machine directly with Java or C#, the VI Toolkit (for Windows), the VI Perl Toolkit, or any other scripting toolkit or programming language that leverages the VI SDK. Full functionality is restricted to the VI client. I believe that this is VMware’s attempt to prevent third parties from developing management solutions for ESXi and selling them at lower cost than VMware’s VirtualCenter.

Despite these restrictions, I recently discovered a workaround that allows full access to the API. The method to circumvent VMware’s lockdowns will not be discussed here because it is unintentional and violates section 3.3 part 4 of the ESXi EULA:

You may not … create, develop, license, install, use, or deploy third party software or services to circumvent, enable, modify or provide access, permissions or rights which violate the technical restrictions of the Software.

VMware has been notified and is currently working on a patch to resolve this issue. Remember that in the interim, this method or any other means used to gain full access to the API in the free version of ESXi violates the EULA and should not be used.

That said, it’s still pretty cool :)


August 8, 2008  4:10 PM

Peripheral virtualization for VMware environments



Posted by: Rick Vanover
Rick Vanover, VI3, Virtualization, VMotion, VMware ESX

On SearchServerVirtualization.com, I wrote a tip about virtualizing server I/O. In this video blog, I want to explain a few points specific to VMware environments for peripheral virtualization, including devices that help with difficult system conversion projects.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/MCn7fx39Tl8 " width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

VMware environments and peripheral virtualization


August 5, 2008  4:27 PM

Best of VMworld Awards are back – enter now for VMworld 2008



Posted by: HannahDrake
VMworld 2008

Like last year, SearchServerVirtualization.com is judging the Best of VMworld awards this year at VMworld 2008. We are now accepting entries.

FAQs:

1. What are the Best of VMworld Awards?

The Best of VMworld Awards are awarded by SearchServerVirtualization.com to the best products displayed at VMworld in Las Vegas, September 15-18, 2008.

2. Who decides which products will win?

A team of judges consisting of experts and editors from SearchServerVirtualization.com will judge the products according to the following criteria:

–Innovation
–Value
–Performance (where relevant)
–Reliability
–Ease of use

3. How many awards will be issued?

Awards will be issued in the following categories:

–Data protection software – backup, replication, fault tolerance, disaster recovery
–Security and virtualization
–Application and infrastructure management – provisioning, migration, capacity planning, performance monitoring
–Hardware for virtualization – servers, storage, I/O components
–Desktop virtualization – all styles, including hardware and software
–Storage software for virtualization
–New technologies – product being demonstrated to be released or made available between show date and end of 2008
–Best of show

In each category, judges will award a Gold and up to two Finalist awards as they deem appropriate. There will also be an umbrella category of New Technology, which will be awarded for products that are being demonstrated at the show but not generally available yet. In addition, at the judges’ discretion, a Best of Show Award will be selected from among the nominees.

4. Is VMware involved in judging the Best of VMworld Awards?

No. VMware and TechTarget, the publisher of SearchServerVirtualization.com, are partnering to provide these awards. But all judging will be done independently by the editorial team of SearchServerVirtualization.com.

5. How can I enter the awards competition?

You can find the entry form at SearchServerVirtualization.com

6. What do I have to do to enter?

You must submit the entry form by August 15, 2008 and follow the instructions on it for the show period.

7. When will the awards be announced?

The awards will be announced at VMworld on Wednesday, September 17, 2008, September 22, 2008 at 2 PM PDT. Winners will be presented with a plaque or other emblem of the award that they can display at their booth.

UPDATE: The date for submissions has been extended to September 22, 2008.

8. Where do I go for more information?

Contact the awards team at bestofvmworld@techtarget.com.


July 30, 2008  7:43 PM

Configuring Distributed Power Management



Posted by: Eric Siebert
Eric Siebert, VI3, Virtualization, VMware ESX

Distributed Power Management (DPM), part of VMware DRS, is another “experimental” feature introduced in ESX 3.5. It is a “green” feature that provides you with the ability to power down hosts during periods of low activity and then to power them up again as activity increases. DPM works by using DRS to migrate all VMs off the host prior to powering it down. Once the VMs are migrated to other hosts the host to be shutdown enters a Standby mode which is a powered off state. Being that this is an experimental feature still it is not meant to be used in production environments. It should be fully supported and no longer experimental in a future release of ESX.

To configure DPM simply follow the below steps:

1. Ensure that you have Wake-on-Lan (WOL) enabled in your server’s BIOS.

Wake on LAN

2. Check that your host servers NICs support WOL, you can do this by clicking on Configuration, Network Adapters in the Vmware Infrastructure Client. In the network adapter list look at the last column to see if WOL is supported. The NIC that DPM uses is the one assigned to the VMKernel vSwitch, so you may need to re-arrange your NICs so you have one that supports WOL in the VMKernel vSwitch.

Network Adapters

3. To test the WOL feature, select your host and select Enter Standby Mode which powers down the ESX host. Wait a few minutes and your host should be completely powered down. You can wake it back up by selecting Power On in the VI client.

Standby Mode

4. Now that you know the WOL feature works you need to enable DPM. To do this edit the settings for your cluster, then under the DRS category select Power Management. You can then select either Off, Manual or Automatic. The Manual option will only make recommendations for powering off hosts, the Automatic option will enable VirtualCenter to automatically execute power management related recommendations. You can change settings on individual hosts to have them either use the cluster default, always use manual, always use automatic or to disable the feature for them.

DPM Settings

One thing to consider if you do decide to use DPM: If you are using a monitoring system to monitor when your ESX servers are up or down you will trigger an alert whenever a host is shut down. Having servers going up and down automatically can generate a lot of confusion and false alarms. In addition, many data centers measure uptime statistics on all the servers. Having hosts going down during periods of inactivity can significantly skew those numbers. While DPM is a nice feature that is designed to help save money, you will probably have to adjust your operational procedures to exclude the ESX hosts from monitoring and instead monitor only the VMs.


July 30, 2008  7:38 PM

Proprietary ESX drivers explained, enlightened



Posted by: Rick Vanover
Rick Vanover, Storage, VI3, Virtualization, VMware ESX

You may initially be disappointed that VMware ESX does not allow you to install drivers for storage and network controllers (depending on your environment). I have determined why this is, and it is for the better. Let’s go through why this is, what you loose and what you gain.

The drawback to ESX using the proprietary drivers is that tools that go along with your environment may not be available. This is most visible in the storage arena. For environments using a SAN, certain commands that are part of your driver on physical servers that are SAN-attached are not available. For both storage and networking, the esxcfg series of commands can usually get you the information you need if it can not be done within VirtualCenter. For me, this was initially a frustration, but then I saw the light.

The proprietary drivers are really a necessity for the VMware virtual machine file system (VMFS), which in my opinion is the most underrated technology provided by VMware. The benefit of using VMFS outweighs the learning curve required for the esxcfg series of commands.

One of the biggest issues I had when transitioning to VMware from general purpose servers was the storage provisioning. When the storage administrator would present storage to the VI3 environment, the logical unit number (LUN) serial number was the key identifier to the storage. Without the native SAN tool, determining the LUN serial number was a challenge which I shared earlier in a tip on this site. After a small investment in the commands available, I was able to address all required functionality within ESX.

Consider the benefits of VMFS coupled with the use of the proprietary drivers to enable other features such as traditional VMotion and Storage VMotion. More information on VMFS is available in the VMFS best practices white paper.


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