Uncommon Wisdom

Oct 11 2010   6:22PM GMT

Is Facebook Showing Us Something with Groups?

Tom Nolle Tom Nolle Profile: Tom Nolle

With its new implementation of Groups, Facebook has revamped the way it maps relationships into something multi-dimensional instead of the classical “star” configuration.  At least Facebook has offered the option of doing that; whether users will bother is another matter.  What’s more interesting to us is the drivers that made the company change it in the first place, and what it says about social behavior online, and the services that might be based on it.

There’s always people on social networks that measure themselves by the number of “friends” they have.  On business-based LinkedIn, for example, there are whole groups of users who do nothing but race to establish tens of thousands of contacts.  The problem with this approach is that it tosses out the whole notion of a relationship in a social sense.  Studies show that people don’t have that many real “friends” or “contacts.”  About 80% of the average person’s social interactions take place in a group of less than 100 people.  In real life as in cyberspace, we have to balance how many such relationships we create against the difficulty of sustaining them.

Social communication has to reflect the value we place on each individual, but social networks have to build community mass.  We can’t use the latter principle to establish frameworks to support the former; social communication has to be personal.  Will you ask your whole community of Facebook friends for advice on a car?  Perhaps you’d ask the question, but you know that: a) most wouldn’t respond; and b) you wouldn’t weigh their responses equally.

How we watch television, buy cars or plan projects may all involve social interactions and therefore appear to map to social networks, but it’s not a simple direct matter of building a flat community that centers on each of us.  Groups “friend” other groups; they have fuzzy boundaries; they interact through filters.  In short, they’re not Facebook groups, even now, and we’re entering a time when the difference between real social groups and online groups will matter a lot to us.

Wireline social networks are free and relatively controllable, but that’s not true for mobile.  Constant tweets or status updates are a lot more distracting because I’m living when I’m mobile, and I’m sitting when I’m on wireline broadband.  Mobile broadband is going to change our notion of groups and friends from our current Facebook simply because it’s going to force us to decide between living our own lives and paying with airtime and distractions for how others want us to think they’re living theirs.  If you want to look for a truth that Microsoft could exploit to get into the mobile market, look there.

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  • Shilpa Venkateshwaran
    [I]Mobile broadband is going to change our notion of groups and friends from our current Facebook simply because it’s going to force us to decide between living our own lives and paying with airtime and distractions for how others want us to think they’re living theirs. [/I] I can totally see this changing how we view social networking. It will force us to have a filter on things to really bring out what is important and what is not. If you are following a thousand people and on an average even if they tweet once a day that is still a thousand tweets no matter how we look at it its over load of information. I dont know how anyone can keep up with it. We loose ourselves in the world of information.
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