Storage Soup

Oct 4 2013   9:35AM GMT

Verizon jumps into cloud storage market

Dave Raffo Dave Raffo Profile: Dave Raffo

Verizon Terremark this week launched an object-based storage cloud that will compete directly with Amazon S3, Google Storage Cloud, Microsoft Windows Azure and others.

Verizon Cloud Storage is part of Verizon’s overall cloud compute services. Tom Mays, SVP of data solutions for Verizon Terremark, said the main target customers for the cloud storage will be enterprises and government agencies.

Mays said Verizon is using a commercial object storage software, optimizing it and integrating it into a hardware stack that it built itself. It will support SOAP, REST and the Amazon S3 API. He declined to say whose object software is in the stack, but he said it comes from a commercial vendor and not OpenStack.

Verizon Cloud Storage will also support cloud gateways on the market. Mays said it will soon announce which gateways it will support. The storage cloud is now available as a paid public beta.

Pricing is not yet set but Mays said the service will be priced according to levels of durability. He said it currently can protect against seven simultaneous failures, but so far all of the data is in one of Verizon’s 50 global data center. He said more data centers will be added, and the early roadmap includes a three-site geographic distribution setup.

Verizon is looking to expand service to current backup customers, hoping they will add more sites to store multiple copies of data.

“Until now we’ve lacked an object addressable storage platform,” Mays said, adding that the idea of object storage is transparent to most customers.

“Customers are coming to us saying they just want cheap storage in our data center,” Mays said. “They don’t care if it’s file, block or object. The advantage with object storage is the ability to do more efficient geographic distribution than traditional volume-based parity storage systems.”

Mays said he expects storage pioneer Nirvanix’s sudden demise to help Verizon’s storage cloud, although he said it may be too late to pick up Nirvanix customers. While the Nirvanix issue will prompt companies to re-think the cloud, Mays said it also places greater emphasis on going with larger well-established providers.

“I think we’ll benefit from that, it exposes the face that you need to pick your cloud provider wisely,” he said. “You want somebody who’s a stable name and will be around for a while. If you only have cloud storage and no other layered value-added services, it’s not as attractive as having a broad range of things that you can use that storage with.”

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