Storage Soup

Mar 22 2007   1:42PM GMT

Teracloud is just giving it away

Beth Pariseau Beth Pariseau Profile: Beth Pariseau

TeraCloud has introduced a pay-as-you-go pricing model for its SRM software that includes the ability to run at least one level of the package for free–indefinitely.

TSF Express, newly introduced as part of this program, in an SRM tool compatible with Solaris, Linux, Windows and AIX. TSF Express provides daily collection of adhoc reporting capabilities through a Java interface.

Users interested in running TSF Express can go to the website and download a free trial for 90 days without entering any information. If they want to keep using the software, registration is required, but a free year-long license is available with that registration; if in a year’s time the user still wants to run the software, they have to register again, but there is still no charge.

The Express version of TSF includes the ability to gather host-level storage metrics including how many drives and volumes are assigned to a host, how many files directories and domains, including the ability to drill down within individual hosts as well as summary reports. TSF Express can only provide historical information for up to 3 days.

TSF Express can be converted directly, with another set of software licensing keys, to TSF Light, which costs $395 per month for up to 20 terabytes of managed storage and more detailed reporting. “And if you don’t use it,” said Teracloud CEO Gary Tidd, “You don’t pay for it.”

TSF Lite includes longer historical reporting, launch actions, which allow users to create scripts to manipulate the environment based on the SRM tool’s findings, the ability to group servers by application, trending analysis and a topology viewer. Both pieces of software require host agents.

The products will be available through the company’s Web site at www.teracloud.com as of tomorrow. This is Teracloud’s second attempt to reinvent itself as an open-systems storage company, after 12 years specializing in mainframe before its first attempt at repositioning in 2000. The company was brought back into “stealth mode” to develop this latest product in 2003.

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