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» VIEW ALL POSTS Apr 25 2008   12:39PM GMT

Primary storage still means one vendor



Posted by: Dave Raffo
Tags:
Data storage management
Storage protocols (FC / iSCSI)

The term “vendor lock-in” is rarely used in a good way by storage buyers. It usually means you’re stuck with products from one vendor, making it difficult to switch if you’re unhappy or something better comes along.

Still, with probably more options for storage products than ever before, most companies still buy all their primary storage from one vendor. That’s according to a Forrester report, “Consolidate Storage Vendors to Reduce Complexity,” released this week.

A Forrester survey of 170 companies ranging from SMBs to large enterprises in North America and Europe found that more than 80 percent bought their primary storage from one vendor over the last year. That includes 64 percent of the companies with more than 500 TB of raw storage.

The report, written by analyst Andrew Reichman, says using more than one primary storage vendor can make it more complex to manage, provision and support the storage environment. And while using multiple vendors can often bring better pricing, buying from one vendor can result in volume discounts.

“You may have tried to contain costs by forcing multiple incumbent vendors to continuously compete against each other, with price as the primary differentiator,” Reichman writes. “This strategy can reduce prices and limit vendor lock-in, but it can also lead to management complexity and poor capacity utilization.”

The report recommends keeping things simple by and using fewer vendors when possible. However, that advice comes with several caveats: buying all storage from one vendor means taking the bad with the good, and some vendors’ product families differ so much “they may as well come from different vendors.”

Of course, I’m sure there are horror stories out there from organizations that have had bad experience with lock-in as well as those who’ve had incompatibility issues with products from multiple vendors.

2  Comments on this Post

 
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  • Dave Raffo
    Thanks, Dave -- I guess we were on the same wavelength today! http://chucksblog.typepad.com/chucks_blog/2008/04/single-vs-multi.html
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  • Dave Raffo
    One has to give into to vendor-lockin willy nilly when you go for a hardware or service. It has its own advantages like you deal with a single party for accountability. The only issue would be of price and data migration. Apart from that it is not a bad idea to go for a single vendor.
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