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» VIEW ALL POSTS May 31 2011   1:28PM GMT

Don’t turn data archiving into data hoarding



Posted by: Randy Kerns
Tags:
archiving
removable media

Archiving has the potential to change individual behavior, depending on how it is implemented and introduced to data owners. An archiving system can prompt data owners to alter the way they handle their data, and this could unintentionally circumvent the reasons for the archiving system.

To illustrate this, let’s take a real example from a company that will not be identified here, and a specific user in that company. The company instituted a new policy that data stored on primary storage systems would be archived if it had not been accessed in six months. After the data is moved, the user would have to submit a request form to access it. There was no time guarantee for the restoration, but the first retrieval for others had taken two weeks. This included the time it took to process the request and retrieve the data. (The “processing” of the request was suspected to be the time consuming area here).

This is where behavior modification came in. Realizing it was not easy to get data back, the user turned into a data hoarder. Some data believed to be vital to refer to in the future was stashed elsewhere – on storage areas that were not scanned for archiving. Other data was copied to removable media and put in a desk drawer. This was done to avoid the delay in getting data back when needed, and the potential inability to get the data at all due to technical or administrative breakdowns.

Obviously, data hoarding defeated some of the reasons for archiving. The data did get moved off primary storage but was placed on other tiers besides the archiving tier. Other data was copied and put into a desk drawer, which could become a security risk.

The real issue is the way archiving systems work and how the process is presented to the data owner. The archiving systems need to allow the owner to see his data and access it when necessary in a reasonable amount of time. There has to be some confidence that data just won’t go away.

Creating a successful archiving environment requires systems that meet the need and an approach that works for the company and users. If not, behavioral change is a probability. Data hoarding is a basic instinct.

There’s more on archiving here.

(Randy Kerns is Senior Strategist at Evaluator Group, an IT analyst firm). 

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