SQL Server with Mr. Denny

Jan 15 2018   4:00PM GMT

Welcome to Security Week at DCAC

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

Tags:
Security
SQL

With the announcement of the CPU “issues” in the last week or so, this week has quickly become Security Week at DCAC with our blogging. This week will all be capped off without security webcast this Friday.  If you follow the DCAC Blog, you’ll see different security topics from everyone this week, with one new one coming out each week.

SQL Injection

I wanted to take this time to talk about our old, and poorly named, friend SQL Injection. To date, this is still the most common way for data to be exposed.  As applications get older and more corporate applications get abandoned the risk of them being abandoned gets worse and worse.  As I’ve written about time and time and time again, SQL Injection is a problem that needs to be solved on the application side. However, with enterprise applications that get abandoned this becomes hard for a business to deal with as some business unit needs to pay for these changes.

And that need to paying for development time to fix security issues is why SQL Injection issues can come up. For old applications, business units don’t see a value in fixing applications (or at least verifying that there’s no issue with the application) so the applications will just sit there until an issue comes up. And by the time it does, those problems aren’t going to go away they’re just going to get worse as you now have customer data (or employee, or vendor, etc.) out there in the wild. Now you have a Public Relations issue on top of your security issue.

Issues like we saw this month get pretty logos and flashy names, but for the most part these kinds of issues require some sort of server access (yes I know there’s proof of concepts out there).  But with SQL Injection as long as the application is exposed to users you have the potential for a problem.

We’re not just talking about external users here, but internal as well. Most breaches that companies have where data is taken are internal. In other words, you let the person into your office, gave them credentials to your network and let them go nuts on your network. I couldn’t tell you the number of unauthorized routers, Wi-Fi access points, or applications that scan the network I’ve found over the last 20 years.

So to recap, your biggest threats are employees that are inside your firewall, attacking old applications that haven’t been updated in years but still have access to information worth stealing.

It’s time to secure all those old applications.

Denny

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