SQL Server with Mr. Denny


May 2, 2014  2:00 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for May 02, 2014

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: TheSmilingDBA also known as Thomas LeBlanc

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny

April 28, 2014  3:00 PM

SQL Saturday Orange County 2014 (289) Slides Uploaded

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

For those of you who attended my sessions at SQL Saturday Orange County 2014 (SQL Saturday 289) I’ve just uploaded by slides for my two sessions.

SQL Server’s In Memory Database Objects
Storage For the DBA

For those that attended my “Storage For The DBA” session, the sample documentation file is included in the download.


April 22, 2014  6:58 PM

Big Challenges in Data Modeling: Ethics & Data Modeling April 24th

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
ethics image via Shutterstock

ethics image via Shutterstock

I’m pleased to say that I’ve been invited to join a panel Thursday April 24th at 2pm EDT (11am EDT). This panel is titled “Ethics & Data Modeling“, which is a pretty timely topic given things like the Target breach, HeartBleed, etc.  There will be 5 people on the panel including myself.  The other members will be Karen Lopez, Len Silverston, Tamera Clark and Kerry Tyler.  This will be an interesting panel as Karen, Tamera, Kerry and I will all be located at the same place (should be interesting for Len).

The panel has an open Q&A time where you can ask the panel questions during the discussion.  There are some topics that we’ll be starting with (and probably deviating from pretty quickly).

  • What is the nature of ethics?
  • How do ethics differ from morality? Legality?
  • Can ethics be taught?
  • Where does ego come into play here?
  • What about Codes of Ethics and Codes of Conduct?
  • Is there one right answer? Is there an always wrong answer?
  • What’s the difference between a whistleblower and a tattletale?
  • What tools do we have in making ethical decisions?
  • How should we deal with unethical co-workers? Management? Customers?
  • What does it all mean, anyway?
Register now and bring your ethical questions and comments, and we’ll see you there.


April 19, 2014  4:20 AM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 18, 2014

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: retracement also known as Mark Broadbent

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


April 16, 2014  4:00 PM

Naming Drives

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

I’m a DBA (shocking I know), so I plan everything possible that I can to the servers that I’m setting up for clients. In this case that includes thinking about what’s going to happen when the server (or VM) totally fails and they need to rebuild the OS from scratch and get everything back up and running as quickly as possible. In order to help in this task I make sure that all the drives on these servers are named with some sort of descriptive name which includes the drive letter that they’ll be using. This way when I have to rebuild the OS on the server I don’t have to think about which drives get which letters when I present them all back to the server. Something like this (which is for the tempdb drive of a server). Can you guess which drive letter I’ll be using?

DriveLetter

If you said the “T” drive you would be correct. It’s that last letter that gives it away. Now granted I have to assume that no one is going to change the drive label for this to work, but so far that hasn’t been an issue as it makes perfect sense to people as soon as I tell them why I do this.

I started doing this back in the pre-VM days when we had all the servers as SAN attached servers and when doing system migrations involved moving LUNs from server to server and you needed to reassign drive letters to 10 LUNs quickly. This became a nice easy way to figure out what was what, and it doesn’t require any remembering what the server config is.

Denny


April 13, 2014  10:17 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 11, 2014

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

 

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: paultebraak also known as Paul te Braak

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


April 9, 2014  2:00 PM

Viewing Maintenance Plan Logs

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL Server

For many of my customers I’ve got them setup to use maintenance plans because they are small shops without a DBA and the maintenance plans give them something visual which they can easily tweak later on if needed without having to have me come in to make a small change to their reindexing or backups, etc.

One of the big failings of the maintenance plans is the reporting in Management Studio. If you right click on a maintenance plan you get an option to view reports and it gives you a whole bunch of really nice info … sometimes. After the plan has been running for a while it just sits there not giving you any useful information. And that’s because the code behind the maintenance plan report page … SUCKS!

The process does a bunch of row by row querying instead of just dumping a single large recordset like any normal application. So how do you get that useful information from SQL Server. The query below will give you the exact same information that the GUI gives you, but without waiting forever for the GUI to open up. Just change the plan and subplan names to the ones that you are looking for and run the query.

SELECT
ld.line1 AS [Line1],
ld.line2 AS [Line2],
ld.line3 AS [Line3],
ld.line4 AS [Line4],
ld.line5 AS [Line5],
ld.server_name AS [ServerName],
ld.start_time AS [StartTime],
ld.end_time AS [EndTime],
ld.error_number AS [ErrorNo],
ld.error_message AS [ErrorMessage],
ld.command AS [Command],
ld.succeeded AS [Succeeded]
FROM
msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_plans AS s
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_subplans AS sp ON sp.plan_id=s.id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_log AS spl ON spl.subplan_id=sp.subplan_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_logdetail AS ld ON ld.task_detail_id=spl.task_detail_id
WHERE
((sp.subplan_name= ‘Full’)and((s.name=’Backups’)))
ORDER BY
[StartTime] DESC

Denny


April 4, 2014  2:00 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 04, 2014

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: tjaybelt also known as tjaybelt

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


April 2, 2014  5:00 PM

How I Setup TempDB

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

How TempDB should be setup is a question that comes up a lot, mostly because there is a lot of bad information out there.  So here’s how I typically setup TempDB for the bulk of my clients, and these settings will probably work for you as well.

Number of Files

The number of files that you need for tempdb, in most cases is 8.  There’s plenty of websites and blogs out there which say that you should have one tempdb database file for each CPU core that you have.  And that was true, for SQL 2000 because we only had 4-8 cores in the machines.  For 99.9%+ of SQL Server instances 8 tempdb database files will do the trick.

You’ll need to add more files for the tempdb database when you see waits on the PFS data pages (the easiest way to see this is by using sp_whoisactive as it’ll say PFS if the waits are on a PFS page).

File Size

The size of the tempdb database should be what ever size it grows to normally.  If you’ve got one database file today, and that gets up to 15 Gigs, when you break that out to 8 files, make each one about 2 Gigs in size.  This way when SQL starts up the space is already allocated and you don’t need to worry about the database growing.

 

Auto Growth Settings

Typically I set the auto growth settings for the data files for the tempdb database at 1 Gig.  For systems which are a lot larger I might go with a bigger number, but for most clients we set a 1 Gig auto-growth setting.

Transaction Log

For the transaction log things are a little big different.  I’ll typically start with an 8000 Meg file.  If I think that it’s going to grow a lot (based on experience for this instance) I’ll set the growth for 8000 Megs.  If I don’t think it’ll grow much or at all I’ll set it for 1000 Megs.  These numbers look a little funky because of some auto-growth bugs which have existed in the past.

So that’s it.  That’s how I’ll typically setup the tempdb for my clients.

Denny


March 29, 2014  5:11 AM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for March 28, 2014

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry


This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: daveberm also known as David Bermingham

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


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