SQL Server with Mr. Denny


February 14, 2009  6:42 AM

A response to a response to my post about Open Source Software



Posted by: Denny Cherry
John Little, Open Source, Social Commentary

Shortly after I posted about a /. article on getting open source software to replace Microsoft software I got a few responses on Twitter, as well as a response from a fellow blogger here on the IT Knowledge Exchange John Little.

John posed a few questions in his post, which I wanted to address, as well as clarify my own statements a little bit. Continued »

February 11, 2009  8:55 AM

Things You Know Now…



Posted by: Denny Cherry
Colin Stasiuk, Denis Gobo, Michael Deputy, Twitter

It’s my turn for the Things You Know Now post thanks to Colin Stasiuk.  The basic question asked at the beginning of the thread of posts is “What do you wish you knew when you started?”.  Here are my answers.

1. People don’t like being shown up.

This was an issue for me mostly at the first IT job when I worked at Earthlink.  While I had an IT job, and an IT function I didn’t work for the IT or MIS departments, I actually worked for the Customer Support department.  This gave me some advantages and some disadvantages.  The biggest advantage to getting things done for my customers was that I didn’t work in IT, so I didn’t have to follow the strict IT guidelines for getting stuff done.  The downside was that I didn’t have the support or respect of pretty much anyone in the IT department for the company.  On more than one occasion my customers would follow proper procedures and ask the IT group to build something, and they would get a crazy long time line like 12-18 months.  Then they would come to my group and we’d give them a time line of 3 weeks, and we would deliver on that date.  Needless to say the IT development teams didn’t like this very much at all, and in the long run it didn’t help me out very much when it came time for layoffs.

2. Knowing everything isn’t the key

When working in IT, knowing everything about every topic isn’t the most important thing.  When I started in IT I tried to learn everything, and I mean everything.  And while knowing at lot is important, knowing everything isn’t.  The only time that you have to work in a vacuum is when you are at a job interview, other than that you have access to Google, Books, MSDN, etc and you can easily look information up if you don’t know it.  I feel that while knowing a lot is important, knowing how to find the information is just as important.

3.  User Groups are a great place to get information, and meet other admins

When I first started in IT (and for several years after that) I didn’t know about user groups.  I wish that I had, because I haven’t known a whole lot of DBAs over my carrier until recently.  I think it would have been great to know more DBAs earlier in my carrier, as well as get more information first hand from local senior level people.  Recently I’ve been speaking at a lot of user groups and I’ve met a lot of great people at the meetings.

I’ll pass the fun onto a few friends (which as far as I know haven’t been tagged yet).

Denis Gobo (@DenisGobo on Twitter)
Michael Deputy (@MichaelDep on Twitter)

Denny


February 8, 2009  8:53 PM

Why are some open source people so adamant about doing a discervice to their users?



Posted by: Denny Cherry
Open Source, Social Commentary

This isn’t a rant about open source software itself; please note the difference BEFORE bashing me in the comments or on the net.

However I recently saw a post on /. about how a university network admin wanted to start switching the university over to open source.

The only thing that came to mind was why on earth would you want to do such a disservice to your students?  While open source is great, most large companies (which is where most university students want to end up) don’t use much if any open source applications.  In the article he’s talking about replacing Office 2007 with Open Office.  Which is a fine idea for home, or for a business; however an educational institution should be more concerned with making sure that the students have access to what they will be using in the real world when they get into the job market.

Ideally I think that these students should have access to both applications, but they definitely shouldn’t be taking away access to the propriety software which the student will need to know how to use in the job market.  For example a student who is majoring in Business will probably need to know how to use PowerPoint, and the differences between PowerPoint and the open source equivalent.  However if all they are taught in school is the open source version, and they are asked to bring a presentation to an interview and give it, and the presentation doesn’t work in PowerPoint they will not be getting that job.

Many open source fans need to remember something.  While you may not like Microsoft and other close source companies (but lets be realistic, for the most part you don’t like Microsoft) these companies software are the tools that over 95% of companies use.  And while it’s great that you want to teach people that there is an alternative out there, if your role is to educate users you have to show them all the options.  If you choose to only show people the open source option, and not the propriety option then how is what you are doing any better than what you feel Microsoft does?  But if users don’t know how to use the tools which companies are providing then the users won’t be able to get jobs.  If people can’t get jobs then they can’t buy computers to run open source software.

And don’t think that if all the job applicants can’t use Office this will force companies to switch to an Open Source version.  This will simply give the companies more ammunition to send more jobs overseas where people are still being taught Microsoft products.

I guess the summary of this post is this.  If you want to teach open source, then be open about it.  Teach both ideas, and give your students a fighting chance to get that good job they were promised when they went to college.

Denny


February 7, 2009  10:25 PM

Standalone SQL Agent Phase 1 Beta 2 Released



Posted by: Denny Cherry

This afternoon I’m pleased to say that I’ve released the Phase 1 Beta 2 build of the Standalone SQL Agent. Continued »


February 4, 2009  9:07 AM

Happy Birthday to Me



Posted by: Denny Cherry
Family

Today is my birthday, so no second technical post from me today.  I’m out with friends having a blast.

(I’m actually at home with my wife playing video games, as most of these blog posts are written well in advance, but it sounds good to say that I logged in to day and wrote this.)

Denny


February 3, 2009  2:47 AM

Rights to System Stored Procedures



Posted by: Denny Cherry
Permissions, System Objects

Why on earth to people want to go changing the rights on the system objects. Continued »


February 2, 2009  1:31 PM

Back To Basics: Clustered vs NonClustered Indexes; what’s the difference?



Posted by: Denny Cherry
Back To Basics, Clustered Index, Index, Nonclustered Index

SQL Server has two basics kinds of indexes. They are clustered and nonclustered indexes. There are some fundamental differences to the two which are key to understanding before you can master index tuning.

Continued »


January 29, 2009  11:10 PM

First Beta of Standalone SQL Agent released



Posted by: Denny Cherry

It took me a little less time than I expected to get an acceptable build put together. Continued »


January 29, 2009  7:03 PM

Standalone SQL Agent Status Update (Jan 28, 2009)



Posted by: Denny Cherry

I’ve made some good progress on the Standalone SQL Agent that I’ve been working on. Continued »


January 29, 2009  8:27 AM

SoCalCodeCamp Photos were posted



Posted by: Denny Cherry
SoCal Code Camp

Marc Salsberry has posted some pictures from the SoCal Code Camp on his facebook page.

If you know of other pictures please post links here or on Twitter with the #socalcodecamp tag.

Denny


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