SQL Server with Mr. Denny


July 27, 2009  11:58 AM

Push vs. pull: Configuring SQL Server replication

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

I’ve published a new artcile over on SearchSQLServer.com.  This article is titled “Push vs. pull: Configuring SQL Server replication“.  In this article I talk about the differences between the two, and when each should be used, as well as how to combine them to get the best of both.

Denny

July 23, 2009  11:12 PM

Yesterday’s Webcast Recording posted

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

The folks at Quest and Live Meeting worked overtime to get yesterday’s webcast recording posted already.  This way if you missed the great webcast that Trent Mera and I did you can at least catch it afterwords.

Denny


July 23, 2009  10:31 PM

Join me on Sept 15, 2009 as we talk about Clustering SQL Server without a SAN

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

On September 15, 2009 I’ll be hosting a webcast entitled “How to Set Up a Cost-Effective Windows Server 2008 Cluster with SQL Server 2008 and Tune The Performance“.  During this webcast I’ll be showing how to use Starwind Software’s iSCSI Server software to replace to need for a SAN when creating your Windows 2008 and SQL Server 2008 server.

The presentation will start at 2PM EST, 11AM PST.  Pre-registration is required using the above link.

Do note that this presentation will be done a little bit backwards as we’ll dive into the technical content write away, then hit the slide show with the SQL Installation is running in the background.

See you there.

Denny


July 23, 2009  11:00 AM

Design the server to fit the database, don’t cram the database into the server

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

I am so sick and tired of people posting questions on various forums along the lines of “We just bought a Some brand and model of server and it has n hard drives in it.  How should I setup the database on these drives?” Continued »


July 20, 2009  11:00 AM

Changing the default owner when creating objects

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

When a user that doesn’t have sysadmin rights creates objects by default they will be created in the schema that is the users default schema.  Now the catch to this is that if you grant the user rights into the database via a domain group that domain group then the user doesn’t have a default schema.

So, now how do you fix this?  Unfortunately the only fix to this is to grant the users Windows login as a separate login, then grant this login rights into the database.  You can then grant the user which is mapped directly to the users Windows login a default schema of dbo.

Because of this the user should specify the schema when creating objects.

The downside to this is that they won’t be able to use the object editor to create new tables.  All new tables will need to be created in T/SQL directly.

Denny


July 17, 2009  1:31 AM

Webcast next with on Troubleshooting the SQL Server service

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

Next week I have the pleasure of presenting another Pain of the Week webcast for Quest Software.  This weeks topic will be on Troubleshooting the SQL Server service.

And as a bonus one lucky attendee will win SQL Server expert Kevin Kline’s new essential reference book, SQL in a Nutshell.

See you on the webcast.

Denny


July 16, 2009  11:00 AM

Non-sysadmins create tables under own schema

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

When using SQL Server 2000 and the user doesn’t have sysadmin rights, and their login isn’t mapped to the dbo user within the database all objects created will be, by default created under the user schema.

This is the normal behavior of SQL Server 2000.  In order to allow users who are not members of the sysadmin fixed server role to create objects under the dbo schema by default you have to map their login to the dbo user, even if they are a member of the dbo fixed database role.

To work around this, in the T/SQL code specify the owner of the database object.  If your developer is using Enterprise Manager to create the new tables before saving the table, click on the properties button in the upper left hand corner of the Enterprise Manager window (second from the left).  Then change the owner drop down from their username to dbo.  There is no way to default this setting to dbo so it will need to be changed for each new table being created.

Denny


July 13, 2009  11:00 AM

Windows 2008 C Drive doesn’t always extend correctly

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

When using VMs and Windows 2008 you have the ability to easily grow the C drive on your servers. This makes it much easier to assign only the space needed to the C drive of your servers saving you a ton of space.

However I recently had a few machines say that the disk was extanded in Computer Manager and diskpart, but Windows Explorer (aka My Computer) showed the old amount. And growing the disk a second time doesn’t help. Shrink the partition (either in diskpart or Computer Management) then extend it again seamed to fix it for me.

Denny


July 9, 2009  1:27 AM

Setting up SQL Server Service Broker for secure communication

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

Today a new article that I wrote was posted up on SearchSQLServer.com.

The article is about setting up SQL Service Broker to use Certificates to secure the traffic between the instances.

Denny


July 6, 2009  11:00 AM

IIS 7 and Session State

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

While working on moving my companies data center from Texas to California we ran across an issue with IIS 7 on Windows 2008 because we were using the ASPState database to handle session state.

If you’re like me you probably upgrade when you have the chance.  If you’re like my company you don’t run just one website per server.  In our case this cluster of web servers runs 6 different sites, and the session state for one of them keeps resetting just about every page view.

Apparently one of the values which is used to create the session id is the ID number of the website in IIS.  Up through IIS 6 this number was a hash of the name of the site, so as long as the sites all had the same name you were set.  In IIS 7 this ID number is now just a running number based on the order you create the websites in.  So if you create the websites in a different order on one or more machines then your ASPState information will keep expiring since the hash values don’t match correctly.

The good news is that you can change the ID number by clicking the Advanced Settings link on the right hand side.

Denny


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