SQL Server with Mr. Denny


March 4, 2015  6:00 PM

Microsoft Ignite 2015, here I come

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
Conferences, IT conferences, Microsoft, SQL, SQL Server

Yep, that’s right. I’ll be speaking at the Microsoft Ignite conference.  This year Microsoft has made the poor decision of allowing me to speak at their conference on High Availability and Disaster Recovery for Microsoft SQL Server both on prep (in your data center) and in Azure (in their data center).  It’ll be a fun session with some demos, some stories and of course we’ll be going through what your HA/DR options with Microsoft SQL Server will be.

I’m thrilled that Microsoft has chosen me to talk about their product at what is going to be their biggest corporate conference in recent years.  I’m really looking forward to seeing some old friends, and making some new ones.  If you are at Ignite come to the SQL Server booth (sometimes called Data Platform) and say hi (I’ll probably be there a lot of the time when I’m not presenting) or come to my session (not sure when or where it is yet) and check out my presentation and say hello afterwards.

You can see the sessions that I’ll be presenting on my bio page. Hopefully I’ll see you at Ignite, and if not you’ll (probably) be able to watch the recordings of the sessions pretty quickly after they are presented (I’m assuming that they will be recording them just like they did at TechEd).

Denny

February 27, 2015  6:38 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for February 27, 2015

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL, SQL Server, Windows Azure

The most important thing to read today is the New York times notice of Mr. Leonard Nimoy passing.  Today (just an hour or so ago) it was announced that we lost a fantastic actor, musician, poet, director, writer, and all around great guy.  Live long and prosper Mr. Nimoy.  My condolences go out to his family, friends, co-stars, etc.  Leonard Nimoy will truly be missed.

In the IT world, I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: qwalgrande also known as Alberto López Grande

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


February 25, 2015  6:00 PM

My Biggest Demo Fail

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
Conferences, IT conferences, Presentation software, SQL Server, TechEd

Demo’s fail. If you don’t bribe the demo gods well enough things will come crashing down on you. How you handle and recovery from your demo fail shows just how good of a presenter you are.

My biggest demo fail was a few years ago now. Let me set the stage for you. It’s TechEd North America in Atlanta, GA. It’s my first time presenting at TechEd, ever. I get to my room 20 minutes before my session, get up on stage (TechEd has 30 minute breaks or longer between sessions) and fire up my laptop. You see I’ve got 5 VMs that I need to be able to run to make my demo happen. So I fire everything up, get logged into all the VMs, and I’ve got plenty of time left.

I plug in the audio feed to the sound system and fire up some music and tell the room monitors to start letting people in. People start to file in. The room holds probably 400 people and ends up about 1/2 full. A couple of friends have come to sit in the front row so we’re chatting (with the mic turned off). About two minutes to go before my session there’s a loud thud and the screens go dark, and I can see that the room is no longer bathed in the colorful glow of the projectors. The entire room now has a blue tint to it, while my music is still playing.

I head back over to my laptop and see that yep, it’s blue screened. The audience starts to give the congrats your machine blew up applause.

I quickly reboot my machine and get the slide deck back up on the screen while booting up my VMs while giving the talk.

Everyone in the room knew exactly how badly screwed I was, but by the time I got to the demo portion of the session the VMs were up and logged in, and the demos worked exactly as expected. Thankfully the laptop didn’t blue screen again during the entire time.

The lesson here is that these things happen. All you can do it recover, roll with it, and pray that you can get through it gracefully. It doesn’t matter how much you prepare, things happen. Apparently I did OK, as I presented at the next 3 TechEd North America and the next three TechEd Europe events.

Denny


February 20, 2015  7:07 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for February 20, 2015

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL, SQL Server

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: Aschenbrenner also known as Klaus Aschenbrenner

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


February 20, 2015  7:02 PM

Attend PASS BA Con. Get Knowledge, and Fit at the same time

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL

Are you planning on attending the PASS BA Conference, but you’re just looking for that right excuse to get signed up for the conference?  For a limited time (from now until March 31, 2015) if you sign up for the PASS BA Conference and put in my name  andpass email address as the person who referred you (just like I’ve posted below),  and you’ll get a FREE FitBit Flex activity tracker (the legal stuff is at the bottom).  So go and get registered before the price jumps from $1595 to $1795 on March 17, and either way be sure to get registered before March 31st to get your free FitBit Flex. This offer can’t be combined with a discount code and is only available for the next 200 registrations so get in quick!

If you aren’t sure if you should go you need to check out the fantastic set of sessions that are scheduled for the conference as well as the top tier keynote speaker, founder of BI Brainz, and author of Data Visualization for Dummies Mico Yuk.  With the session lineup, the speakers and the great sponsor line up this sure does look like the conference to attend for people in the BI and BA space.

Denny

 
Terms and Conditions: A referral to the conference and eligibility to receive one FitBit Flex (valued at US$99) for you and is defined and limited to a complete registration to the conference not combined with any other offer or discount code. You must enter my first name, last name, and email address in the “How did you hear about the Conference” section of the online registration form in order to be eligible to receive the giveaway. Only one FitBit Flex will be available per individual registering for the Conference. By participating in the above promotion, each participant waives any and all claims of liability against the PASS, its employees and agents, the promotion’s sponsors and their respective employees and agents, for any personal injury or other loss which may occur from the conduct of, or participation in the promotion or from the use of the FitBit Flex. Full Terms & Conditions here. This offer can’t be combined with a discount code and is only available for the next 200 registrations so get in quick!


February 13, 2015  11:56 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for February 13, 2015

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL Server

Happy Friday the 13th.  This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: hope_foley also known as Hope Foley

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


February 11, 2015  4:00 PM

The New Nimble Caching Algorithm is Awesome

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL

I’ve been working with a client who has been having some performance problems with their Nimble array for one very specific workload.  This workload was a replication distributor that was receiving a huge number of inserts with a new very small updated.  The inserted rows are very wide.  The insert performance was fantastic as expected as that was being written to flash.  Where the performance problem was happening was when SQL was reading new pages from the disk so that the new rows could be written to the new disk.  This was apparently happening in such a pattern that the Nimble couldn’t identify the pattern and do any prefetching of those pages into it’s SSD cache.

Well apparently this was a known issue, because at the recommendation of Nimble the firmware on the Nimble array was upgraded, and the new caching algorithm enabled.  As soon as that happened the array started pre-fetching the correct blocks into SSD cache and the replication performance improved dramatically.  Instead of loosing about 3-4 hours per day (getting 20-21 hours of replication completed per 24 hours day) we were able to blaze through the backlog.  At the time the firmware up graded replication was about 8 or 9 days behind.  Within 1-2 days the replication had completely caught up.

I’d say that’s pretty good.


February 7, 2015  5:17 AM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for February 06, 2015

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SharePoint, SQL, SQL Server

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: regbac also known as Régis Baccaro

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


February 4, 2015  5:00 PM

No, I Will Not Be Using Your “Secure” Email System

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
Adobe security, Consumer confidence, Document retrieval, IT security, SQL

I get the occasional email with some attachment, that I then have to log into some “secure” system in order to gain access to the attachment. Usually it’s a PDF that I need to sign, either for personal or business reasons. And it’s usually a one off process. Recently I’ve seen an even more annoying process. The Original email has the attachment, but the attachment (usually a PDF) has a password included which I need to go to the annoying “secure” system in order to get the password.

Recently I got one of these from my insurance sales guy. He told me (as he emailed me the PDF without a password) that it was done for compliance reasons.

Let’s review why this is a waste of time.

You’ve sent me a document which has a password. The email includes a link to the website which has the password. Assuming that I’m an attacker who wishes to steal this document that means the attacker has access to my mailbox. So that means that the attack also has the URL. And can click on the reset password link on the website, which allows them to reset the password. Then reset the password to the website, and get the password. So the attacker now has the file, and the password for the file. It took said attacker an extra 20-30 seconds to get the passwords.

That’s assuming that the attacker didn’t spend the $20 to get PDF Password Recovery which would allow them to simply remove the password from the document without needing to know what it is.  And that $20 is a one time fee.  They can unlock all the stolen PDFs that they want after paying for the software, probably with a stolen credit card or just finding a cracked version of it which I was just to lazy to see if there was, spoiler I’m confident if I spent 10 minutes looking I could find a cracked version for free.

In short, I applaud the idea of making sending me a document more secure.  “A” for effort, “F” for implementation.  Two factor authentication (which is basically what they are going for) doesn’t work when both factors rely on the same device, in this case my email software.

Now you are probably thinking that I must be crazy for allowing this sensitive information to be emailed around like this.  The confidential information in this document was my name “Denny Cherry”.  The policy number of my new insurance policy, the amount of the policy, and my insurance guys work address.  That’s it.  Technically there’s nothing in there that really matters.

If we are going to make things “secure”, let’s make them actually secure.  Enough of this making it look secure to the general public.  I get that we need to have some security around this sort of thing.  If this system worked correctly when he uploaded the document to their secure system, it would have asked him for my cell phone number.  Then it would have texted me the password for the document so that I had the password and the text at the same time.  That would be secure and just about as easy to use.

Denny


January 30, 2015  6:10 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for January 30, 2015

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry
SQL, SQL Server, SQL Server 2005, Windows Server 2003

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

This weeks SQL Server person to follow on Twitter is: SQLNorthdoor also known as SQL Northdoor

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny.

Denny


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