SQL Server with Mr. Denny


May 1, 2013  2:00 PM

I’m using simple recovery, so the log file isn’t important right?

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

One of the big myths of SQL Server resolves around the transaction log, and how it’s used with the simple recovery model.

Many people think that the simple recovery model doesn’t use the transaction log.  More specifically they think that it’s there because it has to be there, but that SQL Server doesn’t actually use it.  The reality is that SQL Server still uses the transaction log, much like it does in full or bulk logged recovery modes.  There are some transactions which are going to be minimally logged, but for the most part the INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE commands are going to be fully logged just like normal.

What SQL Server does with the transaction log in simple recovery model is that when the transactions are committed they are written to the transaction log and the pages are dirtied in the buffer pool.  When checkpoint runs the dirty pages in the buffer pool are written to the disk.  Everything up to this point is basically the same as with the other recovery models.  Once the checkpoint has been completed things get different between simple recovery and the other two recovery models.  With the simple recovery model the virtual log files which were just checkpointed and had their dirty pages written to disk will be marked as no longer in use (status=0).  With bulk logged and full recovery this doesn’t happen until the transaction log backup has been completed.

Hopefully this helps dispel the myth.

Denny

April 26, 2013  5:04 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 26, 2013

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny

.

Denny


April 24, 2013  2:00 PM

Write about what you care about. If you do the page views will happen.

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

Ask any SEO “expert” and they’ll tell you to write stuff that’ll get you lots of page views, to use key words to lure people in.  The problem with this approach is that you end up not writing about the stuff that people want to read week over week, month over month.

Now getting people to show up on your site once isn’t all that hard.  Say something shocking, something like “The iPad sucks really bad”.  (Feel free to insert some other product in there.)  But this will only get the people to your site once, maybe twice.  In the long term you need to keep the reader coming back week over week, month over month.  To do this you need to write about things that you care about.  When you start doing that people that care about the same things that you care about will find your site and they will read your content.  And most importantly they will come back week after week, month after month, as long as you keep posting content that is relevant to your readers they will keep coming back.

Now that said yes I do realize that I’m breaking my own rule here.  Most of the time I’m writing on this site about SQL Server (or other kinds of technology stuff) and not how to maximize page views, but sometimes I like to step outside my comfort zone a little bit, and this would definitely qualify.

Denny


April 19, 2013  5:03 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 19, 2013

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny

.

Denny


April 17, 2013  2:00 PM

Advertising != Engaging

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

Some people just really don’t get social media. Recently a twitter account which belongs to a SQL Server training company who based on their website is a legit company. In what I can assume was supposed to be an advertising campaign they completely ruined their social media standing, and in 7 minutes managed to get their twitter account suspended. Grant Fritchey summed up what they did perfectly in this tweet.

Their plan was apparently to message a lot of people (I counted about 70 including myself) with a link to their website. Apparently a lot of the people who received the message reported them as a spammer because within about 7 minutes of the first tweet their Twitter account was suspended thus ending their social media campaign.

I’m guessing that the goal of the tweets was to drive some business to their training program, but that has managed to backfire.

Lots of people make this mistake, and it’s a pretty easy one. Engaging with people that might become customers is a great thing, however engaging with those people doesn’t have to mean advertising and shoving your website down their throat. If people want to find your website they will. You don’t need to shove it at them. This is the digital version of the flier in the (snail mail) mailbox that everyone just throws away. But in this case the people getting the flier have a way to stop the flier from being delivered ever again. You’ve been blocked, and probably reported for SPAM which has gotten the account suspended and you’ll have to beg Twitter to let you have your account back.

Hopefully they have figured out that this isn’t the approach to take, and hopefully if you were planning on doing this you’ve changed your mind.

Remember Advertising <> Engaging and the goal of social media is to engage not to advertise.

Denny


April 12, 2013  5:03 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 12, 2013

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny

.

Denny


April 11, 2013  2:11 AM

Using your US Phone in Europe Without Going Broke

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

There are lots of horror stories of people going to Europe on vacation or on business and coming home to massive cell phone bills. Even if you know that you are going to be paying a lot it’s really easy to end up with a few hundred dollar international roaming cell phone bill. There are thankfully some ways around dealing with this. How easy and expensive this all is really depends on who your US cell phone carrier is.

If you are on AT&T or T-Mobile things are actually pretty easy. The first step is to make sure that your cell phone supports all the frequencies that you need. If you have a quad band phone you are done with this step. Most of the newer 3G and 4G phones are quad band.  I recommend an Android phone, as that’s what I’ve got so I know that this all works perfectly.

The next thing you need to do is have AT&T or T-Mobile unlock your phone for you. They’ll probably charge you a few bucks, but pay it.

If you are on Verizon (which is my US provider) or Sprint you are pretty hosed and you’ll need to pick up an unlocked GSM phone. Google sells phones directly which are unlocked, which is where I bought one from.  If you are going to Europe a lot this makes sense.  If not you can pickup a used phone from eBay that’s either unlocked or easily unlockable pretty easy.  You can either unlock the phone here, or you can unlock it at most cell phone shops in Europe for a few dollars.  I recommend an Android phone, as that’s what I’ve got so I know that this all works perfectly.

The next step is to get a Google Voice account (this needs to be done while you are in the US).  Right now Google Voice is free (that may change, who knows).  Setup an account, you can use a separate number if you’d like, which is what I’ve done.

The next step is to get an app on your phone called GrooveIP.  This will let you connect to Google Voice without using the voice network in Europe.  Now this app is only available for Android phones.  There is an app called Talkatone which I haven’t tried which is available for Android and iPhone.  Talkatone routes the calls through Talkatone’s servers, while GrooveIP routes calls directly from Google Voice to your phone via Google Chat.

If you want people to be able to send you text messages you’ll need to install the Google Voice app.  This app is free from iTunes and from the Google Play store.

Once this is all setup and working while you are at home in the US you are good to go.

When you get to Europe your first stop should be to the shops at the airport after you clear customs and immigration.  Tell the person behind the counter that you need a SIM card and a top up voucher.  The back of the SIM card box will probably tell you which top up voucher you need to purchase to get the unlimited data plan.  If they don’t offer an unlimited data plan go with something which has a large data usage.  Cell phone calls going over the data network are about 1.2 Megs per minute.  So a Gig plan will handle about 900 minutes of voice calls.  Install the SIM card, if this is your US phone don’t loose your US SIM card as you’ll need that when you get home.  If you don’t know how much top up credit you need, ask the guy behind the counter.  He probably knows as people ask him all day long.

Make sure that you read the instructions on the SIM card (or have someone translate them for you if they aren’t in English) as to how to activate the unlimited plan if that’s an option.  The unlimited plans usually don’t activate themselves and you’ll burn through a LOT of money on a pay as you go plan.  Usually it involves sending a text message or making a free phone call to activate.

At that point you can launch GrooveIP or Talkatone and make calls to the US for free.  This works because GrooveIP and Talkatone send your call over the data network instead of the voice network like a normal phone call.  Now if you need to call your hotel or a phone number within the country that you are currently in you’ll need to use the phones normal dialer so that you aren’t using Google Voice to make that international call.

If you aren’t on an unlimited plan be sure to keep an eye on your data usage through the phones normal metering feature to make sure you don’t run out of data service, and swing by just about any supermarket to purchase a top up card for the phone service.

Keep in mind that if you are jumping between countries while in Europe (which is really easy to do) you’ll need a different SIM card and plan for each country as the pre-paid services don’t have international roaming on them.  If you are doing this I’d recommend writing the country that the SIM card goes to on the SIM card so that you can try and use it again in the future.  Some of the phone providers lock out the cards about 180 days without use and some don’t.

Hopefully this helps on your travels.

Denny


April 5, 2013  5:18 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for April 05, 2013

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny

.

Denny


April 3, 2013  2:00 PM

How Many SQL Server ERRORLOG Files Do I Keep?

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

When working with SQL Servers there are lots of settings that people like to tweak to make their SQL Server run smoother.  One setting that I really like tweaking is the number of ERRORLOG files that are kept.  By default SQL Server keeps the last 6 ERRORLOG files around deleting the last one each time that the instance is restarted (or sp_cycle_errorlog is called).  But if I need to dig back a really long time 6 files may not be enough, especially if you cycle the ERRORLOG every day or week.

Because of this I will typically change the number of ERRORLOG files which are kept on the server to 20, maybe more (if the log will be cycled ever day).

You can change this setting from within Management Studio by right clicking on the “SQL Server Logs” folder in the object explorer and clicking “Configure”.  Just change the setting and click OK.  The system accepts any value from 6 to 99.  You can also script this using xp_instance_regwrite system stored procedure.

EXEC xp_instance_regwrite N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'Software\Microsoft\MSSQLServer\MSSQLServer', N'NumErrorLogs', REG_DWORD, 20
GO

Hopefully this comes in handy.
Denny


March 29, 2013  5:04 PM

Recommended reading from mrdenny for March 29, 2013

Denny Cherry Denny Cherry Profile: Denny Cherry

This week I’ve found some great things for you to read. These are a few of my favorites that I’ve found this week.

Hopefully you find these articles as useful as I did.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter where my username is @mrdenny

.

Denny


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