SOA Talk

Dec 30 2009   6:24PM GMT

Top 10 SOA Talk posts of 2009 – part 2



Posted by: RobBarry
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This year the IT industry proved SOA is not “dead,” as Ann Thomas Manes had alleged. A manifesto codified key implementation principals and the pundits started talking about SOA as the true way to approach cloud computing. And it became clear to many that the marriage of BPMN and BPEL is indeed suffering some growing pains.

Here are the rest of this year’s top 10 blog posts:

Taking the long view of SOA and cloud computing
The major problems with grid computing were that it was too complicated and of too narrow use. But, let’s be frank and earnest, its biggest problem was that the term ‘Grid’ was too rigid and inflexible. That problem of Grid computing has been easily solved. Its name was changed to ‘cloud computing,’ a light and airy term with flexible connotation. Of course, I am kidding; cloud will not solve all the problems of Grid just by the change of a name. The same was the case when object technology met SOA.

BPMN with BPEL, an ongoing debate
While many developers still debate which tools are optimal for modeling business processes, Bruce Silver made some strong points on why Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) does not make modeling with Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) simpler. He had seen a recent blog post by Active Endpoints CTO Michael Rowley claiming that BPMN2.0 with BPEL is simpler than the new BPMN execution language and wanted to set the record straight.

Tools add Web services to existing Java EE applications
“The big technical challenge with using Web services for integration today typically is that you have a number of applications that don’t support Web services,” says Mark Hansen, head of start-up Proxisoft, formerly known as AgileIT. Hansen created software that, once installed in a Java EE environment, allows you to point and click on classes and methods to create Web services.

Facebook APIs add Activity Streaming
RSS and Atom are among the most useful elements to emerge from the XML and Web services revolution that occurred over the last 10 years. RSS seemed a small part of XML initially, but has since become incredibly ubiquitous. Now, the world of syndication may be poised for another leap forward. A lot of the recent syndication activity has been Twitter-like – not exactly mission critical or enterprise-oriented.

New SOA Manifesto walks the middle road
A group of SOA experts released a SOA Manifesto on Oct. 23, which sets out in 106 words the principles they feel are most important to the popular integration strategy. While some may think of SOA as something like Enterprise Architecture, and others, agile development, the SOA manifesto walks a middle road. Several industry thought-leaders have signed the document, including Grady Booch, Toufic Boubez, Thomas Erl and – Ms. “SOA is dead” herself – Anne Thomas Manes.

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