SOA Talk

Jan 21 2010   9:58PM GMT

Ted Neward talks JavaScript, Scala, architecture and more



Posted by: RobBarry
Tags:
Java

Well known enterprise systems consultant Ted Neward recently spoke with TheServerside.com about some topics he will cover at this years TSS Java Symposium. The Q&A session discusses ECMAScript (JavaScript), pragmatic architecture, changes in the Java community and the new programming language, Scala.

Neward said a lot of developers are mistaken about thinking ECMAScript is “some bastardized rip-off of Java.” He said the language has first-class support for functions and lets users change the behavior of a library if they don’t like the functionality. This provides some significant power.

“JavaScript is not just about the browser, it’s another programming language that has full access to the JVM,” said Neward. “It’s about time developers started to exploit that.”

Scala is important, on one hand, because it focuses on programming in the functional mindset, Neward said.

The other thing is Scala represents what I consider to be a generational advance in terms of programming language approach and syntax. There are a lot of things I can do with the Scala language that I really can’t do with the Java language, and certainly not easily. A lot of people criticize Scala for being far too complex, but a lot of what they’re criticizing as being complex is not really baked into language—it’s essentially the library that makes up the Scala experience.

On pragmatic architecture, Neward said he was trying to build a sort of “periodic table of elements for software.” When developers are looking to implement architectural components, he said it is important to have an overview of all the parts involved.

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