SOA Talk


November 18, 2008  1:36 PM

Let’s look behind those SOA implementation numbers!

Brein Matturro Profile: Brein Matturro

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

-By Jack Vaughan

November 17, 2008  4:26 PM

Policy and contract focused architecture

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Perhaps architects are paying too much attention to the services when they work on service-oriented architecture implementation, writes Neil Ward-Dutton. He suggests that they might focus on “contract-and-policy-oriented architecture (CPOA).”

Continued »


November 15, 2008  10:10 AM

Application modernization: COBOL meets .NET

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

How will IT organizations maintain the COBOL applications written by the whiz kid programmers of the 1970s? Continued »


November 13, 2008  3:51 PM

Rails rally cry heard in .NET framework arena

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

Rails as a lightweight framework is getting a look-see from many in the developer community. The Ruby-based architecture walks developers though the common practice of Web application building. “It gives you an object-relational map and does the mapping for you,” said the co-author of the new book, “Rails for .NET Developers.” These authors see value for Rails, even for .NET development teams. Lighter is better, they suggest. Of course Microsoft is tracing these developments too, and has a Ruby software effort, known as IronRuby, underway. The trends are discussed in Rich Seeley’s piece, “.NET Web developers ride Ruby and Rails.”


November 7, 2008  11:49 PM

Is this the dawning of the age of hosted providers?

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

Recently spoke with John Rymer, analyst with Forrester. The topic was going to be cloud computing, but Rymer advised that this term, for now at least, has hardly any meaning. That is because anything that is remotely new is being called a ‘cloud solution.’ For now, says Rymer, a more useful and illuminating term is ‘hosted provider.’ Continued »


November 7, 2008  7:12 PM

Test SOA for the unexpected

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Testing service-oriented architecture requires thinking outside the box to the point that your test cases hit an application with totally unexpected input, argues Thomas Fredell, CTO of IntraLinks. Continued »


October 31, 2008  5:50 PM

SOA meets Cloud Computing at Microsoft PDC

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

For Microsoft there seemed to be a somewhat humbler tone at its Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles this past week. Even the biggest new SOA modeling and Cloud Computing initiatives were described as “nascent” works in progress and subject to change.
Continued »


October 24, 2008  1:40 PM

Forrester sees two compute clouds

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Compute Cloud offerings can be broken down into two types, says Frank Gillett, vice president and principal analyst, Forrester Research. Continued »


October 22, 2008  12:43 PM

Red Hat’s JBoss open source ’superplatform’ – Burton

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Red Hat’s is transforming JBoss middleware into a “superplatform” providing an open source alternative to commercial offering from IBM WebSphere, Oracle, and SAP, writes Chris Hadad, analyst with Burton Group. Continued »


October 15, 2008  6:05 PM

IBM re-architects SOA market strategy

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

IBM is ahead of the curve in providing vertical and horizontal service-oriented architecture products, but may be too far ahead of most of its customers, who are still in the early stages of SOA implementation, writes Dwight B. Davis at Ovum. Continued »


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