SOA Talk


December 18, 2008  2:04 PM

SoaML targets top-down, bottom up or meet-in-the-middle modeling

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

Signs are beginning to appear pointing the way to SoaML, an OMG-backed specification meant to bring a new type of modeling capability to the service-oriented world.

SoaML’s goal is to provide SOA modeling of services within UML, without making changes to UML. As part of that, the spec seeks to support services architectures where different parties use multiple services and where services can be defined to contain other services. Mappings to business process specs are also in store, notably BPDM and BPMN.

Anyone concerned about an over-bearing top-down modeling regimen in SoaML can take heart in its claimed adherence to either top-down, bottom up or meet-in-the-middle modeling.

The SoaML has been percolating for awhile, with more details due in 2009. Just recently, a wiki of sorts has been formed for all things SoaML. A complete working doc is available as a PDF from OMG. And for the over-the-top would-be SoaML enthusiast there is a background feature on the making of the SoaML logo on the Yaya-Colour blog.

December 16, 2008  3:53 PM

Bruce Silver on BPMN

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

We have heard the story of aligning IT and development before, haven’t we? That the story is told over and over does not make it a bad story per se. Some stories bear retelling. If the details change over time, that is helpful.

I mention this while perusing one of the more useful BPM-related blogs. That is Bruce Silver’s BPMS Watch. There have been significant changes in BPM in recent years, and a new notations for workflow description are among them. Silver’s site, and his accompanying columns for the BPMInstitute.org cover this and other ground quite well.

Recently Silver wrote about BPMN as ‘the first serious attempt to provide a common visual language for process description shared by business and IT.’ Well, I don’t know. Journalists very seldom call something the ‘first’ of anything. It is a sure way to get mail from an irate someone who built something before someone else. But irate mail’s a good thing, especially on the blogosphere, so I will let this stand, although I’d have to add that I did hear UML described this way more than once upon a time.

Related BPMN info
Bruce Silver blog – www.brsilver.com
Bruce Silver on BPMN – www.brsilver.com


December 9, 2008  11:41 AM

Interoperability remains SOA bugaboo

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Despite years of work on Web services standards, interoperability remains a bugaboo. Continued »


December 5, 2008  9:32 AM

Fowler on Registries: Something wiki this way comes

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

Object expert, refactoring maven and all around software process guru Martin Fowler took a look at the notion of registries recently, particularly the notion of automated registry service look up. Martin Fowler is an eminent technologist – and like the old broker E.F. Hutton, when Martin Fowlder talks, people listen. Continued »


December 3, 2008  4:43 PM

Legacy lost in Web 2.0 hype, survey finds

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Core business applications are important to companies. But IT hiring priorities are skewed toward Web 2.0 developers, potentially leaving modernization of mission-critical applications in jeopardy, a survey released this week reveals. This is a “ticking time bomb” for IT, the survey sponsor argues. Continued »


November 28, 2008  2:12 PM

WSDL styles, mock objects, and SOAP UI

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

WSDL has been around long enough to take root in the form of different styles. That can play some havoc with generic testing. A recent conversation with Frank Cohen, founder of Push to Test, indicates that tools have taken notice of the WSDL ”dialects.” Continued »


November 24, 2008  7:20 PM

Compute cloud services cross chasm, analyst says

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

IT cloud services are “crossing the chasm,” argues Frank Gens of IDC. But what do enterprises want and expect from the new paradigm in software delivery? Continued »


November 19, 2008  12:10 PM

BPM adoption hits 56% in latest survey

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Business process management is already implemented in 56 percent of IT organizations, according to survey results released today by AIIM Research. Continued »


November 18, 2008  1:36 PM

Let’s look behind those SOA implementation numbers!

Heather Clancy Brein Matturro Profile: Brein Matturro

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

-By Jack Vaughan


November 17, 2008  4:26 PM

Policy and contract focused architecture

Heather Clancy Heather Clancy Profile: Heather Clancy

Perhaps architects are paying too much attention to the services when they work on service-oriented architecture implementation, writes Neil Ward-Dutton. He suggests that they might focus on “contract-and-policy-oriented architecture (CPOA).”

Continued »


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