SOA Talk

Nov 29 2012   3:56AM GMT

Meeting the growing need for apps



Posted by: Jack Vaughan
Tags:
Enterprise architecture

IT is changing. And certain companies are going to face the changes better than others, Andy Kyte, Gartner vice president and research fellow, told a crowd at the Application Architecture, Development & Integration (AADI) Summit in Las Vegas. In particular, he said successful IT organizations are going to learn how to effectively manage information technology and meet a growing demand for applications.

“The growth for demand in application services over the next five years is not one or two percent,” he said. “It is massive and exponential. You have massive amounts of legacy applications that need to be modernized; demand is going up; and capacity to meet that demand is not increasing.”

Kyte noted that while user expectations are going up, the ability of businesses to meet those expectations seems to be going down. From the financial crisis to the burgeoning cost of information technology and the need to deliver agile responses faster than ever, many CEOs and CIOs are struggling with how to keep their organizations competitive—or even afloat.

He said companies should follow these disciplines of highly productive IT organizations in order to succeed:

  1. Break down legacy culture: Instead of having many competitive teams, highly productive IT organizations have lots of teams that are all focused on a common set of objectives. They collaborate and work together toward a shared goal.
  2. Flatten the application development organizational structure: Create a culture of many equals, without emphasis on titles or positions. This will foster respect, and promote shared ownership and responsibility for methodologies and processes.
  3. Build the right software: Highly productive IT organizations have good processes for understanding what is really needed, and when. They put effort into the right things. That means insisting on clarity about nonfunctional requirements before technology selection.

Kyte also stressed the importance of taking a holistic view of the entire life of a system, as opposed to fixating on one of its components. – Stephanie Mann

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