SOA Talk

Nov 18 2008   1:36PM GMT

Let’s look behind those SOA implementation numbers!



Posted by: Brein Matturro
Tags:
Development
SOA
SOA development

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

There was a sky-is-falling frenzy in the blogosphere of late in reaction to a Gartner press release headlined: “Number of Organizations Planning to Adopt SOA for the First Time Is Falling Dramatically,” writes Rich Seeley on SearchSOA.com. But, perhaps, the glass is half full.

Seeley takes a closer look at the data and reports that the survey itself presents a more positive picture of global SOA implementations. The survey found that in 2008, the number of organizations planning to adopt SOA in the next 12 months fell to 25 percent from 53 percent in 2007, but it also found that 53 percent already have SOA up and running.

Get it? Fewer people are starting SOA initiatives because there are more people who have started SOA initiatives. Yes, with a major economic downturn, some of the SOA late-comers have another reason to put off SOA, but, is that news?

Now, we like a good story as much as anybody. Yet we suspect the Gartner data has been blown up in order to fit well with today’s headlines. The devil is in the details, SOA or otherwise.

What lies ahead is more work – work to tame software for the purposes of commerce. SOA arose during the last downturn, largely as a response to too many software integration projects gone haywire.

“The reality is people are doing projects to have re-useable services,” Software AG’s Miko Matsumura told Seeley. Many SOA projects are proceeding according to plan.

“Whether those projects are called SOA or they are called “pickle juice” they will still move forward,” said Matsumura.

Pursuing the purpose behind SOA is the key. Some will succeed; some will fail and try again; some won’t try. We hope SearchSOA.com’s coverage is valuable to the people in the first two categories.

-By Jack Vaughan

 Comment on this Post

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when other members comment.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: