SOA Talk

Oct 10 2011   6:30PM GMT

At Oracle OpenWorld, Ellison warns: ”Beware false clouds”

Jack Vaughan Jack Vaughan Profile: Jack Vaughan

A year ago at Oracle OpenWorld/JavaOne in San Francisco , Java creator James Gosling was sited around the show periphery, people wondered what kind a Java steward Oracle would turn into, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison began selling hardware and took pot shots at Mark Benioff’s Salesforce.com cloud.

This year, a fair consensus held that Oracle might be a little better than Sun Microsystems at moving Java along, Gosling was sited around the show periphery, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison continued to sell hardware and again took pot shots at Mark Benioff’s Salesforce.com cloud.

At the event, Oracle tried to push JavaFX forward, while moving on the HTML5 front as well. It discussed closure support for J EE 8 and Project Jigsaw, a new form of module system standardization.  Meanwhile, Glassfish was demoed with cloud deployment features.

But Oracle’s big cloud push may take the form of cloud management software such as its new Enterprise Cloud Manager. Among other things, this software will go in, study your present systems, and then come up with an architecture you can use to take your applications to the cloud. The end result still seems to include a healthy helping of the Oracle SQL RDB – this despite the company’s roll-out of some alternative Hadoop and NoSQL support at the conference.  As with a lot of Oracle software these days, the NoSQL software rides some fairly high-end Oracle hardware.

When seeking comparisons to the Oracle cloud, Oracle leader Ellison ignored most alternative clouds, to focus on Salesforce.com. He inferred that Salesforce.com offered a false cloud.”Beware false clouds,” he advised. ”True cloud? False cloud? You decide.” This said in the wake of SalesForce.com leader Marc Benioff’s on-again/off-again attempts to stage an alternative keynote near Oracle Open World.

It is true that Salesforce.com’s cloud is largely proprietary. And, Oracle’s cloud as described has a healthy helping of Java and J EE middleware. But cloud architectures are such that it is difficult to judge how open, interoperable and portable a given cloud architecture is – at least at this stage. 

Truth be told, Ellison’s and Benioff’s cloudy bickering looked especially silly as word emerged that personal computer and smart phone pioneer Steve Jobs had died.

We probably don’t have much to add to the parade of Jobs’ tributes that followed his passing, but let’s say this: He worked tirelessly to enhance people’s abilities and experiences using computers, broadening technology’s use far beyond the IT glass house that existed when he started out.

Even his failures fascinated. At NeXT Computer, Jobs went full-tilt forward on object computing. His period at NeXT – the period in exile from Apple – was something of a low-point for him, but out of it came a highly modular operating system that has subsequently enabled Apple to support a variety of hardware formats. He expected object computing to improve developer productivity. What do you think? Let us know. – Jack Vaughan

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  • Jack Vaughan
    Meant to add this bit picked up amid all the tribs to Jobs - this one from NYT. Tim Berners-Lee used a NeXT machine to create the first version of the World Wide Web. High Wow Factor that say I.
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