Security Corner

Apr 9 2008   9:11PM GMT

How to Prevent DNS Rebinding Attacks



Posted by: Ken Harthun
Tags:
Browsers
Firewalls
Networking
Password
Routers
Security

There’s nothing new about the DNS rebinding attack, but it’s in the news again. Dan Kaminsky, Director of Penetration Testing for IOActive has shown a video of the attack in action at the RSA 2008 Conference. I first addressed this problem more than a year ago in a Lockergnome posting, and just recently in this Security Corner article. Both of those articles say the same thing: Change the default password on routers, switches, and any other configurable device on your network.

There’s another thing you can do: Use OpenDNS; they block known phishing and malware-infested sites, thereby making your web surfing more secure. They also just released a nifty tool called FixMyLinksys that makes it easy for anyone to change the default password and enable OpenDNS. An article at DarkReading.com had this to say about OpenDNS:

…“This will stop all the automated attacks that Dan is showing at the RSA conference today. It’s easy and is done over the Web,” says David Ulevitch, CEO of OpenDNS.

OpenDNS also launched a new type of DNS filter today that protects users from a DNS response from a malicious server. “In short, a DNS response from a malicious server that resolves to a host inside your network would get blocked,” Ulevitch says.

I’ve been using OpenDNS for some time; I’m glad to see they’ve addressed this issue directly.

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