Security Corner

Jan 14 2010   9:17PM GMT

Beware Haiti Spam & Phishing Emails

Ken Harthun Ken Harthun Profile: Ken Harthun

With the recent earthquake disaster in Haiti, everyone should beware of any emails or solicitations on social networking sites asking for donations to help the citizens of Haiti. The cyber-slime out there typically begin exploiting the gullible shortly after such an event. This comes via msnbc.com:

Security software company Symantec says it typically starts seeing spam and phishing e-mails seeking money, “donations” or access to bank accounts about 24 to 48 hours after after news of a major tragedy such as Haiti’s.

And it’s not just e-mails that need to be closely monitored. It’s social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook, as well as fake Web that sites can pop up as fast as the news itself. There’s also the problem of “search engine poisoning,” which “we’re seeing limited examples of already” in the quake’s aftermath, said Joris Evers of McAfee security software.

The FBI gives tips to avoid getting scammed:

Before making a donation of any kind, consumers should adhere to certain guidelines, to include the following:

  • Do not respond to any unsolicited (spam) incoming e-mails, including clicking links contained within those messages.
  • Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves as surviving victims or officials asking for donations via e-mail or social networking sites.
  • Verify the legitimacy of nonprofit organizations by utilizing various Internet-based resources that may assist in confirming the group’s existence and its nonprofit status rather than following a purported link to the site.
  • Be cautious of e-mails that claim to show pictures of the disaster areas in attached files because the files may contain viruses. Only open attachments from known senders.
  • Make contributions directly to known organizations rather than relying on others to make the donation on your behalf to ensure contributions are received and used for intended purposes.
  • Do not give your personal or financial information to anyone who solicits contributions: Providing such information may compromise your identity and make you vulnerable to identity theft.

Anyone who has received an e-mail referencing the above information or anyone who may have been a victim of this or a similar incident should notify the IC3 via www.ic3.gov.

Here’s more good advice from the Better Business Bureau: BBB Advises Donors on How to Vet Haiti Earthquake Charity Appeals.

By all means, help; just make sure your help is funneled in the right direction.

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