Overheard: Word of the Day

Nov 18 2013   1:43PM GMT

Word of the Day: fruit of a poisonous tree

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

Overheard

“Even if you own a network or are responsible for its security and maintenance, you may not have the unfettered right to watch what network users are doing.”Richard P. Salgado

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is fruit of the poisonous tree, a legal doctrine according to which any secondary evidence obtained indirectly through illicit means is inadmissible in court. Examples of such sources include evidence gained through eavesdropping, illegal wiretapping, coercive interrogations, unwarranted searches or improperly conducted arrests. Information obtained from those sources is inadmissible according to the law of exclusion.  Continued…

Related Terms

eavesdropping
electronic discovery
wiretap Trojan
government Trojan
hackerazzi

Quiz Yourself

What do you call the the destruction, alteration, or mutilation of evidence that may pertain to legal action?
a. spoliation
b. spoilation
Answer

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