Word of the Day Archive


May 21, 2010  12:44 PM

Overheard talking about Peppermint

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
Peppermint combines the base Linux operating system with a number of cloud-based applications and services. The result is a lightweight distribution, but with integrated access to some of the most popular online apps. Better yet, Peppermint uses Mozilla Labs Prism so the cloud-based software looks and acts like desktop software.

Matthew Humphries, Cloud-focused Peppermint Linux OS now available

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is Peppermint.

May 20, 2010  12:43 PM

Overheard talking about EU Transparency Directive

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
All EU-wide legislation must be “transposed” into nation-specific law by the European Union’s 27 member states; keeping those transpositions in harmony can be difficult, and the Transparency Directive is no exception.

Jeremy Woolfe, EU Transparency Directive Seeks to Reshape Reporting

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is EU Transparency Directive.


May 18, 2010  10:46 AM

Overheard talking about the National Quality Forum

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
The National Quality Forum is mulling a change of the definition of serious reportable event (SRE) and although the change is only involves one word, that word could truly effect the intent of the term. Currently the definition is “preventable, serious, and unambiguous adverse events that should never occur.” The proposed change would replace the word “never” to “not”… The committee is hoping that by dropping the “never” from the definition, more harmful events could be included into what is reported by hospitals, leading to further quality improvement.

Heather Comak, NQF considers change of ’serious reportable event’ definition

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is National Quality Forum (NQF).

There are six defined categories for SREs:

•    Surgical (for example, an instrument left in a patient)
•    Product or device (for example, a malfunctioning respirator)
•    Patient protection (for example, a baby is discharged to the wrong person)
•    Care management (for example, the patient receives the wrong medication)
•    Environment  (for example, the patient falls in a health care facility)
•    Criminal event (for example, the sexual assault of a patient)


May 18, 2010  10:36 AM

Overheard talking about interstate health data exchange

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
A major snare to interstate health data exchange is the state-to-state variation in health privacy laws that makes exchange difficult to achieve and compliance near impossible. The differences make it especially tough when getting to the nearest big hospital for care requires crossing a state line.  The variations in privacy law from state to state are really an impediment to doing business in a consistent way.

Paul Grabscheid, Delays in EHR adoption could threaten eligibility for license renewal

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is serious reportable event (SRE).


May 17, 2010  2:05 PM

Overheard talking about customer intelligence

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
Trigger data such as life events, birth of a child, death in the family, household move, or bankruptcies create an opportunity to influence customer responses.

Leslie Ament, Tips for using analytical tools to take action on customer data

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is customer intelligence.

Leveraging customer intelligence often requires change. Organizational behaviors, business process workflows, as well as technology enablers will require modification in order to succeed. In addition, new skill sets and statistical data-driven expertise will need to be acquired, either through training, selective hiring or engagement with managed services providers.


May 14, 2010  4:57 PM

Overheard talking about the Open Government Directive

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
A lot of these agencies are built on infrastructures that can’t handle the demand, especially when you put out that information on the public domain.

Vivek Kundra, Gov 2.0 Summit

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is Open Government Directive.

Guest blogger: Crystal Bedell

Open Government Directive provides requirements for the online publication of government data. U.S. executive departments and federal agencies are required to release public information online in machine-readable, open formats, thereby exposing their operations to the public. They are also required to integrate public participation in the policy-making process.

The Office of Management and Budget issued the Open Government Directive and its instructions in 2009 by order of President Barack Obama. The Open Government Directive’s goal is to promote transparency, participation, and collaboration between the federal government and the public. The transparency that comes with online disclosure is intended to promote accountability and enable public participation in the policy-making process.

To comply with the mandate, agencies had to identify “high-value information” that was already available online, identify “high-value information” that was not online but would be, and establish a timeline for that data’s publication. There has been some confusion, however, as to what data constitutes high value. The Open Government Directive definition of high-value information is very broad, including data that can “increase agency accountability and responsiveness; improve public knowledge of the agency and its operations; further the core mission of the agency; create economic opportunity; or respond to need and demand as identified through public consultation.”

In addition to publishing public data, each agency must publish an /Open page on its Web site (e.g., www.justice.gov/open) that discloses the agency’s efforts in regards to the initiative and engages the public, looking for help and feedback on its processes.


May 13, 2010  1:41 PM

Overheard talking about Common Criteria

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
For many decades, security engineering was a specialized topic, primarily considered within military organizations or by those working with them. Standards like TCSEC and ITSEC from the 1980s and 1990s, and later the Common Criteria, described the software-engineering activities needed to develop and validate security-critical systems.

Dr. David Basin, Integrating security into the system development process

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is Common Criteria.


May 12, 2010  3:22 PM

Overheard talking about Section 508

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
“One of the most painstaking web programming tasks is achieving web accessibility. Although estimates vary, between 5 and 10% of Web users have some sort of accessibility need.”

Nick Kellett, Sharepoint Accessibility

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is Section 508.  According to a Sharepoint tutorial on SearchWinDevelopment.com, SharePoint 2007 outputs a lot of code that is not compliant with Section 508 or other accessibility regulations.


May 10, 2010  3:05 PM

Overheard talking about text mining

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
Not surprisingly, analyzing unstructured content across the enterprise is an expensive undertaking. If it weren’t, the mega-vendors like SAP and IBM probably wouldn’t be interested in it.

Jeff Kelly, Calculating text analytics ROI: Start small and focus on customer data

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is text mining.


May 6, 2010  1:38 PM

Overheard talking about 100 Gigabit Ethernet

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
While 100 Gigabit Ethernet is the key for the service provider core, we believe better economics will drive adoption of 40 Gigabit in enterprise data centers.

Kevin Wade, Force10 Networks lays out 40 Gigabit Ethernet switching roadmap

Today’s WhatIs.com Word of the Day is 100 Gigabit Ethernet.


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