WhatIs.com Word of the Day Archive


December 18, 2007  8:14 PM

Video: What is the purpose of a SAN?

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

[kml_flashembed movie="http://youtube.com/v/J3qzpKSGoSQ" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

December 18, 2007  7:51 PM

Overheard: In love with a geek?

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

Give this one a minute. Literally. I promise you’ll warm up to it.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://youtube.com/v/m8cJHRSBXSY" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]


December 18, 2007  7:32 PM

Overheard: Wikis in Plain English

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

[kml_flashembed movie="http://youtube.com/v/-dnL00TdmLY" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]


December 18, 2007  7:26 PM

Overheard: Erik MacGyver in the datacenter

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
cd_drawer.gif “I’d have to position the servers just right, somehow get the heights and alignment correct, and update the polling script to eject the CD ROM drive any time it didn’t respond to ping.”Jake Vinson, ITAPPMONROBOT

I love this story. I can picture it perfectly in my head. Reminds me of our old IT Bloopers series.


December 18, 2007  6:40 PM

Overheard: W3C XML Schemas lack elegance

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
tim-bray.jpg W3C XML Schemas (XSD) suck. They are hard to read, hard to write, hard to understand, have interoperability problems, and are unable to describe lots of things you want to do all the time in XML.

Tim Bray, as quoted in Should you be using RELAX-NG?

Tim was co-editor of the XML 1.0 specification and created the first parser software for XML documents. Currently, he is the Director of Web Technologies for Sun Microsystems.


December 18, 2007  5:52 PM

Overheard: You know you’re a geek if you tattoo cables on your arm

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/lRkJh5lLZ5s" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]


December 18, 2007  12:14 PM

Overheard: The web is one big fuzz test

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
matt-cutts.jpg I can tell you that the web is a fuzz test. If you write a program to process web pages, there are few better workouts for your program than to pipe a huge number of web pages into your program.

Matt Cutts, The web is a fuzz test: patch your browser and your web server

Matt writes: One of my favorite computer science papers is a 1990 paper titled “An Empirical Study of the Reliability of UNIX Utilities”. The authors discovered that if they piped random junk into UNIX command-line programs, a remarkable number of them crashed. Why? The random input triggered bugs, some of which had probably hidden for years. Up to a third of the programs that they tried crashed.

That paper helped popularize fuzz testing, which tests programs by giving random gibberish as input. Some people call this a monkey test, as in “Pound on the keyboard like a caffeine-crazed monkey for a few minutes and see if the program crashes.”


December 17, 2007  4:24 PM

Overheard: Facebook as an intranet CMS

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
bill-ives.jpg “They established a private Facebook group for Serena employees and they built a few simple custom Facebook apps to better enable intranet functions. Now they provide links through Facebook to documents stored securely behind the firewall. Access is just as secure as any other method.”

Bill Ives, Serena has Adopted Facebook as Their Intranet


December 17, 2007  4:14 PM

Video: Web 2.0 Bubble

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/I6IQ_FOCE6I" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]
“Here Comes Another Bubble” Credits (Versions 1.0 and 1.1)
Performed by The Richter Scales Music


December 17, 2007  3:53 PM

Overheard: Googlepedia

Margaret Rouse Margaret Rouse Profile: Margaret Rouse
michael_arrington.jpg “Anyone writing for Knol is likely to at least peruse Wikipedia content before publishing. And if they see anything good, they are at liberty to simply lift and copy it over to Knol, and get a adsense check for their time.So, in a way, Google has found a way to monetize Wikipedia content after all.”

Michael Arrington, A Few Thoughts On Google Knol

It’s been interesting to watch Google and Wikipedia battle it out. Wikia is supposed to announce their new search engine soon, meanwhile Google stays one jump ahead by announcing “Knol.” According to Udi Manber (Google official blog), a knol is short for a unit of knowledge.

Google  says “A knol on a particular topic is meant to be the first thing someone who searches for this topic for the first time will want to read.”

Other points of interest: “The key idea behind the knol project is to highlight authors. Books have authors’ names right on the cover, news articles have bylines, scientific articles always have authors — but somehow the web evolved without a strong standard to keep authors names highlighted.”


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