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» VIEW ALL POSTS Aug 12 2010   4:30PM GMT

Fibre Channel over Token Ring: Converged storage dilemma solved



Posted by: rivkalittle
Tags:
802.5qZ
FCoTR
fibre channel over token ring

The FCoE debate is over. At last there is an answer to converged storage networking that leaves tiresome Ethernet behind: Fibre Channel over Token Ring (FCoTR).

The newly launched FCoTR Alliance is working feverishly to develop the 802.5qZ standard, which will soon be submitted to a standards body.

The alliance “is responding to growing industry pressure from a diverse group of networking and storage professionals” with the primary goal of furthering “the awareness, adoption, and commercial support of FCoTR.”

More importantly, the alliance aims to prevent storage professionals from ever having to learn burdensome Ethernet technology while enabling long-time networking admins to remain comfortable in a technology they know and love – Token Ring.

“The adoption of Fibre Channel technology means an opportunity for network convergence. Leveraging my existing Proteus token ring network for use with storage is a very desirable proposition,” said Jose Chavez, director of information technology for Superannuated Systems, Inc.

FCoTR also enables both storage and networking purists to keep the Ethernet gene pool clean.

“Many Fibre Channel gurus balk at the idea of Ethernet being capable of guaranteeing the right level of lossless delivery and performance required for the SCSI data their disks need. IP Junkies like Greg Ferro ofEthereal Mind balk at the idea of changing Ethernet in any way and insist that IP can solve all the world’s problems including world hunger (Sally Struthers over IP SSoIP.) Additionally there is a fear from some storage professionals of having to learn Ethernet networks or being displaced by their Network counterparts,” writes esteemed Define the Cloud blogger Joe Onisick.

Ferro – who is one of a team engineers drafting the standard – is only attempting to help storage professionals maintain their Fibre Channel investment.

“For all those Storage Nut Jobs who can’t imagine their precious FibreChannel frames crossing an Ethernet network, we are proposing the development of FibreChannel over Token Ring. That’s right, the second best networking protocol ever invented (after FDDI), offers everything you sad, attention deficit ridden, storage losers ever wanted in shared network. Deterministic delivery, over engineered cabling, layer 2 troubleshooting. We can even improve the FC protocol by isochronous transmission for serial clocking performance and guaranteed delivery,” writes Ferro. “Last known Token Ring standards were developed to Gigabit performance, and it shouldn’t be too hard to dust them off and ramp them to 10Gigabit and more.”

Once the 802.5qZ standard is established, it is very likely vendors will launch a series of product (most of which promise not to be interoperable, but will be launched with lavish press events, maybe even one on the New York Stock Exchange floor). Here are some predicted product launches:

· EMC SLOW (It’s the version of FAST that supports Token Ring)

· NetApp SMTR (SnapManager for Token Ring)

· HDS UPS (It is to USP what UPS is to FedEX)

· 3PAR HeyNow! (3Par requires each disk to say “Hey Now!” if they want the token)

· Compellent Frozen Data (It’s the Fluid Data line slowed down so much it freezes)

· IBM WHU (The Prequel to XIV)

· HP StorageDoesntWork (Just saying)

 

Learn more about the lossless storage over token ring in this in-depth and well-explained video on FCoTR.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=13399464" width="400" height="225" wmode="transparent" /]

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