Open Source Software and Linux

Jan 7 2009   8:05PM GMT

Apple removes copy protection for iTunes music downloads

John Little Profile: Xjlittle

Apple is removing copy protection for music downloaded from it’s iTunes store. They are also cutting prices to as low as 69 cents per track.

This is really good news for everyone! If you’ve ever had to restore a crashed disk or tried to copy and play protected music tracks from one media device to another you quickly found out that you were out of luck. In the case of a hard disk crash, well, your music and your money were history.

Pricing for music from the iTunes store will come in three levels. The lowest is 69 cents, the middle level is 99 cents and the highest level is $1.29. Apple made this agreement with the record labels in exchange for selling their music free of copy protection, also known as DRM. All 10 million songs on the iTunes store should be available in this format by the end of the 1st quarter.

While this may sound unique to many people it was actually done the 1st time by Amazon. Amazon made a similar agreement with record labels in 2007. As I have posted before Amazon also offers free downloads of selected individual tracks and albums. Hence my loyalty to Amazon.

I would imagine that iTunes probably made this move to better compete with stores such as Amazon. After all wouldn’t you rather have the freedom to play your music on whatever media that you prefer? If you are a loyal fan of the iTunes store however this is good news for you. Now you get flexible pricing and the ability to play your music on any device that you want and even copy it to several devices to fit your lifestyle.

Isn’t competition great?

-j

1  Comment on this Post

 
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  • Kevin Beaver
    This is great news - thanks for the post. And yes, much to the dismay of many, competition is wonderful!
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