WindowsXP and Linux dual run, anyone?

110 pts.
Tags:
Dual booting
Fedora Linux
OS installation/upgrades
Windows XP
Hello, I saw a post on linuxforums.com asking for help with a problem installing Fedora 7 on Windows XP MC to dual-run the programs on the same computer. Has anyone else here tried this? Any inconclusion, dead-ends....or SUCCESS? I look forward to your answers. In the meantime, I found these relevant resources on SearchEnterpriseLinux.com: 1. Virtualization for Dummies, Chapter on Implementing Fedora 7 http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid39_gci1305147,00.html 2. Tip, Dual-booting versus Virtualization http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid39_gci1262981,00.html 3. Tip, Running Windows as a VM on Linux http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid39_gci1238129,00.html 4. Tip, Linux dual booting and booting options http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid39_gci958588,00.html Hope these spark a few synapses and/or get some dual booting going:) Tell me how it goes!

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

From your post I assume that you are asking about dual booting WinXP and a Linux distro. I have not done this with Fedora, but I have done a dual boot of XP and Suse 10 on a Dell laptop. The process was pretty straight forward as I already had XP installed on the laptop. I ran the Suse 10 distro on the same machine and it configured the dual boot for me and as I recall I only had to tell it how much space to allocate to the two installs. In this case I split the drive in half giving the same amount of disk space to each OS. I would recommend that you try this on a box that you trash if necessary while testing the install. Hope that helps.


Yuval:

I had a dual-boot with FC6 and XP for a while. It was fairly easy to set up, but not completely trivial. First, partition your drive — each OS will need its own partition. Once that’s done, I believe the order of installation matters — install XP first, and then Fedora. From what I recall, XP’s boot loader doesn’t recognize Linux, but Fedora’s boot loader (grub) recognizes XP, so installing Linux second is the easiest way to ensure that you get grub booting your system, not Windows’ boot loader. I think Fedora’s installer automatically identified the Windows partition and added that as an option for the boot loader’s config. I did all this a while ago, so YMMV. And needless to say, back everything up before you start, and make sure you have plenty of time — just in case you need to try a couple times. ;-)

over al that is correct if u are dual botting but, i belive u need to do FC first then u’er win os sys. everything else is the same speatre partions blah blah
or if u want to run a vertira unix inside of win OS u can use vertiual pc is software that works also there is a CD u can get for free that has fedora on it. u can google free fedora software that way u can play with it and not actuale have to worry dual botting

if i remeber correctly unix is consider an older OS and u always load old before the new OS

Discuss This Question: 1  Reply

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • Rhololkeolke
    I am slightly confused as to what you are asking. You linked to articles regarding dual booting vs virtualization. If you want to run programs in windows and linux at the same time you have to use something like vmware to virtualize one of the operating systems. If you just want to have access to both linux and windows and don't mind having to restart to switch between the two I would recommend dual booting. I dual boot Ubuntu and XP and all I had to do was install XP then install Ubuntu and Ubuntu set everything up for me. I have also done it with SUSE and again it was the same idea just install XP then install SUSE. A side note about virtualization is that it splits your resources between the two machines. Basically this means if you have an application that needs 512 MB of ram you need double that so that you can run both the host operating system and the virtualized one at the same time.
    35 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following