Windows Server 2003 Terminal services

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I am configuring a server to be used as a file server for a small office. The server will be housed off-site and will need to be accessed remotely by 3 users. Is terminal services the best remote access solution in this case? If so can the server also handle licensing or is that necessary? I am new to configuring TS so any help is appreciated.

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Hi, there.

Will these three users be concurrent? If not you don’t need to worry about licensing – you can use the remote administration functionality. If they are, then you’ll need to set up licensing as well. Depending how you’ve licensed your users (user or device CALs), you may need to obtain Windows CALs and TS CALs for this.

Gary

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  • Howard2nd
    A - file server on 2k3 - Is it part of a domain? Or standalone? B - when you say 3 people need remote access, are we to presume you mean for administration of the server? C - If it is just administration, then 'Terminal Services' is way too much effort. 'Terminal Services' is for running applications on the server. All the admin tasks can be performed from an XP workstation. I always recommend the simple way first. Good Luck.
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  • Stuntz
    This server will not be a member of a domain. Instead it will be standalone. It will be hosting a small database which the users will need concurrent access to. I had not considered TS for remote admin.
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  • Boardinhank
    Well you will have to purchase the CAL's for these. No more freebees unless you can run the XP codes in this web link and have them validate that they were purchased before april of 2003 or something I forget. anyway you can run the reg codes and the web site will tell you if they are good for freebies or not. http://licensecode.one.microsoft.com/transition/ once you have them you will have to run the licensing server on this box as well. and lets see. terminal services was made for the reason that you are implementing. If you can script and can give them access to a database through the web that would save a little coin. otherwise get the cals on a per user basis if they are working in different places. if you only have a couple of boxes and multiple users on those boxes then go per computer licensing.
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  • Igeddes
    Stunz, it REALLY depends on exactly what you're wanting to do with your file server. If it is literally just intended to act as a file server - a central point which appears as little more than a remote disk drive - you might even be better served with a free solution such as Linux and Samba. You can configure shared drives to your hearts content and experience the warm glow that comes from knowing you haven't had to pay through the nose for licences that you aren't really using.
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  • Superfreak
    If you are using this as a file server, then I don't see the need for TS or Linux or anything, at least from a straight file server standpoint. You can just map drives to the server. It looks to me anyway, like the issue is the remote access. So, how are the 3 users planning on getting to the server?? Dialup, DSL, WAN.. Seems like it might be better to setup your firewall or router to allow that.
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  • Bigshybear
    Just restating everybody elses options in one message: 1. WinXP has a "Remote Desktop Connection' which is under Programs/Accessories/Communications. On Windows 2k3 server you set up to allow individual users to remote access. This is really designed for remote administration of the server, not really for client use. 2. Terminal services, you are using a program equivalent to PCAnywhere or GoToMYPC. Data stays on the server, you are just getting a display of what is really happening on the server. 3. VPN - If the 3 users have a fast enough link into the internet, AND the site the server is at has a fast enough link into the internet, the 3 users can VPN either into the firewall at the server site, or into the server itself. 'Fast enough' translates to 'Is this fast enough that the users won't complain too much?' For most of my users that is 256k to 384k. Most broadband links are asymetric so look at the slower side of both sides, the user side and the server. Most of my customers are using #3 successfully, including salesmen on the road and construction project managers on the road with laptops. The new Sprint and Verizon EVDO cards that connect to the internet at 256k+ speeds are very popular with my customers so that very mobile people like salesmen and project managers can connect into the server on the road.
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  • Wisdom9
    I will go for bigshybear's suggestion.
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  • Senthilnathan
    FTP can act as a better solution for u. Enable ftp and share a drive or folder and you can set access rights and also access the ftp site form anywhere through broadband connection
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