Windows Messenger

pts.
Tags:
DHCP
DNS
Microsoft Windows
Networking services
Policies
Security
Can someone please tell me how much bandwidth Windows Messenger uses generally. Also, I would like to block all instant messaging on the corporate network. Can someone tell me how to do that with a Cisco PIX

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Windows messenger (as included in XP) doesn’t work anymore – you must mean MSN messenger. Bandwidth use depends on how much FTP-ing is going on, normal chat consumes very little. Most of the IM programs have unique ports, you could only allow port 80 in and out of your network. That should prevent anyone doing much. Apart from going onto the messenger website and using the online version, of course. Not giving users install rights is the best way round this problem.

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  • Howard2nd
    1st - set policy and have it approved. Otherwise it will be the CEO's secretary who wants to IM her niece somewhere who sets policy. 2nd - only allow those ports absolutely required. Unfortunately in Windows that is a lot of high ports for UDP back connections. 3rd - Windows 'Messenger' was so badly compromised that the default 'best practice' is to diable it. Which SP2 for XP does. Good Luck.
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  • HappyGene
    I, Currently, we have a 506E/2950 combo that, between them, allows us to tag *type* of packet, not just direction (port/ip.) I.ve seen our network guy differentiate and put limits on that. If your equipment is not 3rd party *managed*, or you have in-house access to the boxes' reporting, I.d get with your router guy, run traffic metrics (a DEBUG series of commands) and then apply a firm but reasonable limit on non-voip audio/video and unencrypted standard packets. It.s a good place to start and with your CIO.s input you can wander around from there and find the sweet spot between high throughput and insurrection. What.s neat about the Cisco stuff is that you can construct an *envelope* that grows and shrinks based on higher priority traffic. Cisco engineers have ready-made typical patches that you can put into your RUN configuration for an immediate clamp. You might consider modding it fairly quickly, though. Users have innumerable ways to slug traffic which cannot be absolutely construed as retaliatory. I.ve only had to be *mean* twice in 24 years and the extra thought and manipulation to avoid the *heavy hand* were absolutely worth it. I estimate the man-hour ROI (in terms of sudden work-order increase avoided) on this approach to be 6:1 based on two personal experiences and about 20 of my colleagues.. That.s $$ back into budget! :) Gene
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  • Kevin527
    Always an unpopular move!! However, use group policy to stop launching messenger on your workstations. You'll find it under Computer configurationAdministrative templatesWindows Componentswindows messenger then go here http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/isa/2004/plan/commonapplicationsignatures.mspx I'm not sure if these signatures can be blocked by cisco firewalls but they work great with Microsoft ISA Server
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