Will we really save money having users shut down computers at end of day?

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The article below caught my attention. It says that 217 million dollars a year is wasted just in the UK alone by employees leaving computers on overnight. I never shut mine down...my old mentor thought it was actually harmful. Needless to say, we don't have a policy about shutting down computers here at the end of the day. Does anyone else? Would it really save me money in my budget that I could use somewhere else? http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9589_22-5910665.html

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Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

One of my favorite subjects….Thank you for the soap box.

Seriously though…I’m one of those people who keeps my systems running 24/7 – but most of them are servers.

What I recommend for most users is to turn on the PC when you need it – and if it’s going to be used again within 2 or 3 hours, keep it on until the end of the business day.

To save time in the morning, you can set the PC into stand-by (or hibernate) mode (or whatever) and shut off the monitor. That will save the greater portion of electrical power.

Not very scientific, but I hope that helps,

Bob

p.s. I have enough fronts on which I have to be scientific. This isn’t one of them.

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  • Rapple
    Guess there are really two things here. 1) The financial savings 2) The effect that wasted energy may have on the environment. For 1) The savings will be specific to your company and will need to be weighed against wasted time waiting for the Computers to boot up, come out of hibernation etc. however, if the report is about overnight savings it does seem unlikely that the wasted time in the morning will outweigh the cost of the energy used overnight. For 2) Depends on which research you believe about power production and how that affects the environment but common sense says that wasted energy is not a good thing in principle. As I came into computing and manufacturing during the 80s there were whole departments devoted to the reduction of power usage across the multi national corporations. There were a fair number of IT based systems to control it too. There must therefore be some savings kicking around.
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  • Duds0917
    If the computer is not going to be used then it is just practical to shut them off, in this part of the globe where i reside, indoor temperature is not computer friendly and will add strain to the electromechanical parts. We have felt more than 22 times price increase of fuel the past few months and new tax regulation will even add to the burden to our electricity bills. I agree that it is also affect the mother nature we have exprerience its wrath more than that of Katrina and the like due to carelessness of people as small as turning off their PC (no offense meant to anybody i am also guilty as charged). I think everybody can help in their small way to conserve energy thatwould benefit generations to come. Cheers, quilobayt
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  • Duds0917
    If the computer is not going to be used then it is just practical to shut them off, in this part of the globe where i reside, indoor temperature is not computer friendly and will add strain to the electromechanical parts. We have felt more than 22 times price increase of fuel the past few months and new tax regulation will even add to the burden to our electricity bills. I agree that it is also affect the mother nature we have exprerience its wrath more than that of Katrina and the like due to carelessness of people as small as turning off their PC (no offense meant to anybody i am also guilty as charged). I think everybody can help in their small way to conserve energy thatwould benefit generations to come. Cheers, quilobayt
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  • Nileshroy
    Well !! In the organization where I work, we have set the following rules for everyone (Everyone includes even the CEO & the Directors). 1) Shut off your PC / Laptop at the end of day. 2) Shut off your Monitor (these consume more power) at the end of day. 3) Turn OFF your monitor screen if you are leaving your desk even for a minute (like going to the pantry to take a Tea / Coffee or taking a stroll in the office or going to the smoking room). 4) If you are going out for more than 30 min and if there is NO importatnt tasks / applications running on your desktop, shutdown your PC. 5) If you are using a laptop, and you need to leave your desk, press the Hibernate key & then leave your desk. Thats it!! Thats the rule we all follow & are used to... we dont have to dictate / remind anyone about these... its just that its there in us. - Nilesh Roy.
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  • Programmers
    I feel that I am the odd guy after reading these answers. During night we do a virus scan on every local workstation and also a scheduled reboot if required by the Microsoft Software Update Service. I even send a Wake-On-Lan packet to all workstations who are switched off. It is difficult to now when the updates are ready on the workstation because the BITS (Background Intelligent Transfer Service) transfer is using only idle bandwidth. Perhaps we can put all these tasks in a smaller time-frame and power on these stations two or three hours before working hours. Has somebody experience with BITS to save power. Regards, Chris
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  • Nileshroy
    In my case, I have the A/V scans scheduled at 5:00PM. The autoupdates scheduled at 12:30PM.
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  • Rjournitz574
    I go along with Chris. I have close to 2500 client systems ranging from Windows 98 up through XP that I need to get updated not only with Microsft Updates but other 3rd party vendors as well. All told we use just over 100 software products and patching is not limited to the ones from Microsoft. Powering down these devices would only stop this from being accomplished and due to the volume of patches I need to push out it can only be done during off-hours. Currently we run a 100mb network across 20 subnets both local and remote sites. All patching is controlled from central patch servers updating slave patch servers located throughout the network. The slaves control the client updates. No one has yet to mention network printer environments that I also need to get patched. I have even turned off the power saver option on some of the older printers since getting them to wake up can be difficult. We only use network attached printers but they include multiple vendors. End result is no user gets to power down their systems, controlled through GPO and registry hacks, and all are configured to use whatever power saver options that are available short of spinning down the hard drives. This means all monitors are set to have screen savers pop after :30 minutes and will turn off after 1 hour. No Standby or Hibernation is used. For our servers we use KVM's and they are configured to never power off but are configured for screen savers. We treat it as more of a security option, low level to be sure, than as a cost saving measure. That's my 2 cents. RWJ
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  • DonKennedy
    No one has discussed yet whether continually powering off and on is harmful to the hardware, does it shorten the life and cause problems. In the old days, this was one reason to let it powered on?
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  • Poppaman2
    All good replies, now my $0.02: Personaqlly, and for those small businesses which make up the bulk of my "off hours" consulting work, I suggest that systems (except for servers) be powered off. The savings can be quite substantial over the course of a year... In my REAL job (at a global Fortune 500 company (ie: your typical enterprise class corporation)), we leave computers on with monitors shut off for the same reason(s) as indicated above: patching and security updates. These are controlled by machine name (not login account) and will NOT be properly applied if the system is powered off during the patch/update push. We do have both a general (Office) network and a physically secured network. The PS network does NOT get security pushes - I apply patches by hand (I LOVE my job), as the nature of the system useage prohibits overnight patching - updates are scheduled individually as workload permits.... Way back in the stone age (think PX XT and the blazingly fast 4.77 MHz AT), the consensus in my organization (a different one than where I currently work) was that turning on and off a PC would thermally stress the components, and would often cause the individually set 8K memory chips to pop out of their expansion cards; therefor PC's were left on all of the time. Power was relatively cheap, and the office PC's used so little a portion of our overall consumption, that the cost was insignificant... Other companies, in an effort to extend the life of a costly capital equipment investment (think USD 5000 for a PC with 512KB memory, a whopping 20MB HDD and the aforementioned 4.77MHz chip, and an additional USD 1000 for an additional 128KB memory to bring the system to it's full 640KB capacity) would power off computers when not in use (systems could expect to be used for 4 to 6 hours a day MAX). So to summarize and answer your question, you may save money by shutting down your systems, but the trade off is in ease of administration, especially as your environment getrs larger and more complex....
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  • Pedwards17
    It sounds great and very "PC" (pun intended)to want to turn of computers to conserve energy and protect the environment, but in today's patch-happy world, that's not really possible. In order to keep up with the multitude of patches from our friends in Redmond, we depend on our users to leave their PCs powered on so we can push out patches without disrupting their productivity (not too much, anyway).
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  • ItDefPat1
    I mostly concur with most comments so far. Note that: For enterprise, probably best to leave on so that virus scans, patches (etc.) and backups (server and/or workstations) can be done after most workers leave. You don't really save by shutting PCs down. My company advises us to keep PCs on despite the electrical costs. Save operating costs by configuring monitors off, hard disks off, and even system sleep/hibernate. These will save costs all through the day (like during lunches), and more so over night. Most recently built PCs should have this capability built-in, as well as in all recent versions of Windows. Unless there are critical physical environment issues (like heating and cooling of office, etc.) probably OK to leave on. As said in above paragraph, it may be BETTER to leave on. If you are in a cold climate, leaving on could actually warm the office up a bit... At home, despite the sleep of monitors and systems, I turn all my systems off during the summer (which is April-October in Florida). This is due to cooling costs, prevalence of lightning and power outages during summer. If this applies to you, this might be a consideration. I have a whole house suppressor, strip suppressors on the walls, and UPSes for the PCs; I still turn my home PCs off. If you have less concerns, or more confidence in the power supplied, then you might not want to turn off. If you find benefit to keeping PCs on, the you can compensate for some of these other issues. For example, get rid of light bulbs (incandescent); replace with fluorescent. A 75W bulb can be replaced with around 20W of fluorescent for the same lighting; you'll also get major cooling savings from the cooler bulbs.
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  • Sonotsky
    I changed jobs in July of this year, and including my present employer, this is the third company I've worked for, where some form of desktop management was done from a central server. For non-laptop workstations, the IT desktop staff would create the deployment packages and fire them off to the desktops overnight, to minimize downtime/poor performance/interrupted work from the user's perspective (for laptops, they would be forewarned when a new package was coming, so they could attach to the network, boot up, and go for a coffee). So from that perspective, it makes sense to have the systems stay on overnight. However, monitors should be powered off - even if they're set to go to standby; a CRT monitor on standby typically uses only 3 watts, but multiply that by however many hundreds or thousands of monitors, times hours overnight or over a weekend/holiday, and you can see the advantage. You could take it a step further, and set the systems to standby/hibernate, but to Wake On LAN whenever the management server contacts it with an update, then to go back to sleep after a reboot or whatnot. I agree with this policy, and in fact, while it's not there at my current employer, I am pushing to get us there. Cheers
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  • Vschlenk
    Hi guys. We use the desktops during night for grid computing purposes - also do we distribute patches and applications during nighttime. Another aspecht which is really interesting is to have a distributed filesystem with replication mechanisms across the desktops so virtually making use of a so-called data grid ...... greetings !
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  • Solutions1
    Clearly, power management is another argument for "thin client" devices which take less power anyway and that do not need software refreshes and software audits at night. Also, the maturing "virtualization" and increasing throughput of servers at the back end further minimizes server-side power consumption per user. In most situations, saving 1 watt in consumption very well may save another 1,5 watts in air conditioning to get rid of the excess heat.
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  • Lsholland
    Sure it costs money to leave computers on but that is quite insignificant to the to repair computers. Computer ware-n-tare comes from heating the motherboard then cooling often. If you leave it on forever, it'll run forever practically.
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  • Paul144hart
    217 buck million sounds like a lot. But if 20 million workers lost an hour a day staring at their computer while it booted, and cost of labor around $100 / hr, gee, that's ....20, time, 100... 2,000 million dollars. Oh, sorry - 2 billion dollars. So, use the power - Luke. :)
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  • Superfreak
    some basic items to consider on this. 1. Computers run on electricity, which costs money. Shut them off you save money. 2. Computers have fans which suck in dust. I have seen PC's which are squealing due to locked dirty fans, and burn your hand when touching the case by the fan. If happened off hours, could easily start a fire. 3. Electrical components lifespan is tracked by hours of usage, not days or years. Leave a fan, monitor, whatever running 24 hours a day, though only used 8-10, means premature failure rates compared to actual usage. 4. Electrical components(most) heat up during use. Keep them running all the time, plus covered in dust, and again you have premature failure. Shut em down..
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  • Platypus
    I tell my users they may shut their PCs down for the weekend, or if they're going to be away for a few days. Other than that, I leave them up. Servers, of course, are up all the time. My reasoning, which also isn't very scientific, is that almost all of the problems I have with computers is when they are coming up on a cold boot (components, but mostly drives). I like the idea of turning off a monitor or setting the power settings to turn it off, and I do that on my network. David
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  • BlueKnight
    Quite a range of interesting responses here. I've not heard a particular policy set here, but almost everyone powers off their PC/laptop at the end of the day except for a few machines in our network services group. Servers of course, stay up 24x7. Each client has McAfee installed and our patches are pushed so you get them installed when you logon next if your machine is off at push time. The only hard rule is that all non-essential equipment must be powered down at the end of business Thursday since our building is closed Friday in addition to the weekend to save power. Closing Fridays saved so much money we've kept the policy in place for over 5 years now. Getting used to the new work schedule was the hard part.
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  • Ramadden
    I am a tech support / desktop support / network admin. Having almost 25 years experience with hardware upkeep and repair. There are two schools of thought on this topic: 1. the heating and cooling down of the hardware components is like turning on and off a light bulb. The components heat and expand then they cool and contract. This in turn causes the same effect as bending a wire back and forth. this will cause the wire to brake with time. 2. the turning on and off of a computer will allow you to control what runs on your computer and what access a hacker might have to your system. It also depends upon how often you replace your hardware as to its life expectancy. We could get into a great discussion on symantics, suffice it to say that the choice is yours. Rich
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  • ItDefPat1
    The cost savings for turning off are mostly negated by the amount of time it takes to apply patch & virus definitions when users return in morning. If gone for weekend or more, then maybe turn off.... By sleeping monitors (at least), most costs are reduced. Depending on type of system, you can sleep/hibernate them (although I've heard of some issues with Win hibernate on certain specific brands) - test to see what works. I like the suggestion about Wake On LAN - you should use if pusing patches overnight. You can't manage a PC if it is turned off. As to fire hazard, the risk doesn't increase just because its night time! As long as you have some form of smoke, fire and/or heat detection, your risk is the same regardless of time (assuming that you employees are not all certified firefighters!). If you worry about that, you can even get sensors/instrumentation for your network - have your network call emergency if fire! Also, this will help to warn of other unpleasant events like loss of air conditioning. Remember that loss of AC doesn't necessarily mean that the power to systems was also lost. And this may be worse or more common than a fire. As to dust and repairs, if your office is so dusty, ban placing PCs on floor. And I concur that repairs to hard drives and motherboards by up-and-down are only second to problems caused by power (sags are worse than spikes). As long as power and dust are relatively clean, keep the PCs on.
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  • Ahmedamin
    I recommend shutting down for a few reasons: 1) hard drives have a life span, the longer the computer is on the longer the hard drive is running or exposed to some heat. 2) Computers have good ventilation systems by design (good fans too) but many times the computers are buried under a few things over time (paper, stuff) so they could heat up which would affect the computer performance. Where if it was shutdown, then the user will at least start off the day with better performance) 3) The more computers are on the more dust they collect which would clog your vents. 4) In case a user gets infected with a virus after hours, this virus could go out and infect other systems that are on (assuming a new wild virus) in that case the IT person will be in for a good surprise the next morning) This is my dilemma, I might be wrong. As for the computer being on all the time.... I do not see many benefits other than pushing some updates after hours (you can set them to be pushed when the user select to shutdown) or just so the user does not have to wait before they can log back on. Thanks, Ahmed http://www.onlinerack.com
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  • EDPMAN
    Nice question, but it is just a attractive artical publish to show currect computer generation affect on enivronment. I strongly disagree with amount of intrest we give to this, actully if we compaire it with other electricity usage it's nigligible. (If i say.. take whole word mouse ball volumn and sum it, it will definatly equal to area of any country, what i am doing is to collect all small part and compaire it with big one, this is general tack publisher always use). But we should save electricity by accepting some habits, such as use of stand by mode, hibernating, shut off etc. sometimes (spl. in server side) it's not good to save electricity and as all we know insted of calculating the uses of electrict unit in server, calculate amount of benifit it give to us and i afraid it is always maximum.
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  • Jonflex
    America is one of the biggest consumers in this world. We tend to leave on all electrical devices not because we dont' necessarily care but because we don't understand the consequences of our actions. Shutting down and unplugging equipment like pcs, monitors, dvd players, tv's etc, that still draw small amount of electricity when their off can save huge amounts of dollars. Not to mention that about half of the worlds energy supply comes from non-renewable resources (a.k.a oil) which of course creates alot of pollution. Cutting back on electricity needed to be produced can end up with a cleaner earth also. I co-oped for a major printing corporation and they had the shut down policy in effect.
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  • DrillO
    You know, this is a great discussion, but here are some thoughts....the big users of power in the average system is the Monitor (CRT) and the CD/DVD/Optical drives. since optical drives don't spin when you aren't using them, there isn't that much drain in an idle system. Sleep and wake-on-LAN are very useful for things like updates and what have you. I have all my people turn off the monitors at the end of the day. Why not? Every penny counts. If dust and such are a problem and cause worry, then I would suggest that one might want to look at thier maintenance plan. I have a very dusty environment, possibly one of the worst, and I make sure that the cases get cracked and the guts get cleaned regularly. One side note.....this just cracked me up....I used to work colse to another Manager who thought that if the monitor was off the computer wouldn't work overnight when it came time to do updates and backups....it was good for a laugh over lunch with my other associates, but very frustrating as well having to work with guy. There is my two cents. Paul
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  • Bxjay69
    Fact The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory states that modern hard disks are not affected by frequent shut-downs and that equipment may actually last longer because mechanical wear and heat stress are reduced. Action Turn off your computer during the night! Savings If all students at Tufts University turned off their computers at night for 6 hours, it would prevent 572 tons of CO2 from heating the atmosphere each year and save over $87,000 in electricity costs! Security Benefit When your turn your computer off you decrease the risk of someone accessing your files or email.
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  • DaveInAZ
    First, if everyone at paul144hart's company is making $100/hr, please let me know where I send my resume, ASAP. If they're making a more realistic $10/hr (at least in this part of the country, for typical office workers, not SysAdmins), the numbers, as stated, are a wash. But, second, if any company is spending one hour per day, every day, per machine doing patches, I would be amazed and horrified and really curious as to what on earth they're doing that takes so much time. Heck, you can do a full install of MS Office in way less than an hour, and how often do you need to do that? At my company, we push patch-type updates on startup, and it normally takes about 30 seconds. Full application upgrades are done according to the user's schedule. We just get a link to the setup routine. But, even that normally takes less than five minutes. If we can do it, you can do it. So, do I see any justification for leaving a machine running unattended and unused for 16 out of 24 hours? Heck no. Do I leave my machine on? Yep, guilty as charged. Pure laziness and lack of patience on my part. Thirdly, it's a pretty rare company where everyone is at their desks, ready to plunge immediately into the day's work at the stroke of 8:00 (or whenever). In every company I've worked for, other than phone support centers where shift coverage was vital, most workers spend the first 15-30 minutes of each day getting coffee, schmoozing with coworkers, catching up on personal email, and just plain waking up. So, the "Loss of Productivity" numbers are usually purely theoretical and unrealistic (or, to put it another way, "a crock of some indeterminate, but highly aromatic, substance"). So, in the end, I don't think there is ONE answer to the original question. (Yes, I DO remember it. I'm getting there.) Each individual situation is going to be different and require its own cost/benefit analysis. Yes, clearly, you will save money on electricity if you have everyone power down each night. Will that savings be offset by the "wear-and-tear" of all those cold boots? Who knows? I've never heard of anyone studying that, but my gut says no. Hardware is much more reliable, these days, than it used to be. Then there's the actual question of whether the electric bill impacts your budget. Usually electricity is considered a general cost of operation, and not budgeted to any one department. I've never heard of a company where the IT department had to account for the cost of electricity in their budget, but I suppose it could happen. But, you didn't say whether you were a CFO or a CIO or what, so we don't know exactly what you mean by "my budget". In most companies, any such savings would go straight to the bottom line, so the IT department's budget would not benefit directly. If you're a CIO with responsibility for the electric bill, or your company has a policy of passing any savings back the the department that originated the savings, then I guess the answer would be yes.
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  • JacobLnConsulting
    Good grief. Yet again another problem with a solution already in place. Use the power saving features that the manufacturers include. Windows Control Panel Power Options allows the user to specify conditions when to power off drives and monitors. I'll guess these options covers most requirements and more. The notion that power on-off cycles damages electrical components is misguided. That WAS a concern in the past yet isn't these days. It's interesting that no one mention the detrimental effect of power-on surges.
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  • SJKopischke
    Interesting dialogue. However, save one unattributed post, I haven't seen anything actually addressing the central question of whether or not *money* will be saved by shutting computers down at the end of the day. There are a number of factors to consider - some of which have already been posted, but I'll try to gather them all together: Shutting them down ================== - Lost productivity waiting for computers to boot. Small, but still a calculable number. - Lost productivity waiting for patches and updates that can be applied during off-hours. - Electricity savings in the form of system power and (in warm climates & seasons) air conditioning. Leaving them running ==================== - Additional energy costs in the form of system power. - Ease of promoting updates and patches. - Energy savings in the winter months/cold climates due to some systems power being transferred to heat energy. (If we're going to count the energy advantages of turning them off, we need to count the energy advantages of leaving them on.) - No lost productivity waiting to boot. I am sure there are more. The various advantages and disadvantages need to be measured and calculated. Only then will we be able to subtract one from another to determine if there is a cost advantage one way or another and how much it is per system. Until we have numbers, we're just spinning our collective wheels discussing possibilities and potentials.
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  • VietBob
    I'm with the 'leave them on' crowd. Monitors off, PC's sometimes off for weekends, but in general leave 'em on. Use the energy functions in contemporary BIOS and/or in the OS. Clean the grunge out now and then. I sometimes need to access files on my computer at work from home, and vv. If I shut them down when I'm gone, I've lost that. Do I want to waste time, burn gas (and pollute) to drive to work so I can get that file? I don't think so. Would I prefer to have AV/Malware scans and updates dog my PC while I'd like to get things done, or would I prefer to schedule those to happen while I'm sleeping? No-brainer. We have a lot of 'public' computers, those can be shut down and cross fingers that the scans aren't aborted when they start up with the first login. Most of the staff computers, however, are left on. Also, while I understand many components may last longer if they aren't run 24X7, I can't ignore the fact that those damned cheap power switches wear out. I hate it when some honcho can't turn his/her computer on!!! -Bob
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  • VenPhil
    This has opened a line of thinking I began about 20 years ago, and which I completely neglected for the last 8 years or so. I am sitting at my workstation (I work at home), and am looking at SIX power adapters, just to support my desktop computer: DSL modem, wireless router, a speaker system, external hard drive, LCD monitor, and external USB 4-port adapter. Even when I turn everything off, these adapters are still drawing power. Then there is the computer itself, a laser printer, and an inkjet color printer that have direct power hookups. Even when they are off, they still draw a little power (because the switches don't actually break the power connection going to the device). And of course there are the power adapters for the three laptops in use by others in the house. We may turn off the computers (or put them in hibernation) but the adapters are still drawing current. And there is the satellite television system (we live too many miles from a transmitter, and there is no cable in our little town): three devices that we leave in standby, not being able to turn them off without pulling the plug. Oh, I almost forgot the microwave and gas stove (both serve as clocks when they aren't otherwise being used). And the phone and the base for the remote unit. I just did an experiment. I turned off all the computers, speakers, etc., and pulled the plugs on the refrigerator and freezer, checked that there were no lights on, and went outside to look at the power meter. It was chugging away, although slowly, probably one revolution in 2.5-3 minutes (I don't have a watch with a second hand, so I couldn't time it very well.) When I first started thinking about this 20 years ago, I thought it would be logical to install a low voltage system wired just like the normal wiring system, into which things that require power adapters could be plugged, drawing power only when they needed them. Then there would be only one device drawing a little current when none of the devices required power, rather than many. But there are other measure I could use. I lived in a small hut in Italy for several years before returning to a small desert town in Arizona. We had power and water, but no telephone service or gas. The lights from my computer components lit up the small room at night. Because of this and the severe lightening storms we had, I put everything on a power strip with surge arrestor, etc., even the UPS. At night, when I went to bed, I powered down the computer properly, then turned off the power strip (during storms, I pulled the plug, too). So the only thing drawing power was the red light on the power strip. In the morning I would turn on the power strip, and everything powered up automatically, including the computer. I'm probably going to implement that system here, come to think of it. Regarding corporate power usage and PCs, etc., the basic issue is that PCs are used AT MOST 8 hours a day (unless you are a workaholic), plus the 5 minutes/day for AV/Spyware updates (that's what mine takes, and it's manual) plus the 10 minutes every few days for security updates). That leaves a little over 15 hours per day where the PCs are consuming power and doing no work. (Yes, I know there may be other circumstances, such as the person who reported that they do grid computing during off hours, which I think is a very creative thing to do.) The only problem we have is figuring out how to do what needs to be done in the few minutes the PCs are unattended every day, turning the computers on and off remotely. I don't think anyone really disputes the effects of wasting power--either financially or environmentally (or karmically, if you think along those lines). It's just a matter of thinking through what needs to be done to adjust in a responsible manner. Cheers everyone, Phil
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  • JohnBF
    I think the guy whose PCs take an hour to boot up in the morning needs to take a serious look at his hardware and how much spyware everyone is loading! If my PC starts smoking when I'm at my desk I can turn it off and maybe give it a squirt of CO2 if necessary, if it happens at night even with a Halon drench system it will do some damage, if there is a sprinkler system...... Seriously though run all you patches / security updates / Virus scans from a script which runs when the computer is shut down - no loss of performance waiting for it to happen and the machine shuts down after all the work is done.
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  • HenryKafeman
    VenPhil raises a good point. We are encouraged to take our Laptops home at the end of the day to reduce the risk implications of a fire, breakin, etc. But that still leaves all of the Power Adaptors and the Laptop Docking stations to which they are connected powered up! In general our Power Adaptors are actually located inside the cable trays built into our desks along with 4 way mains adaptors which could be powering other devices. So nobody (as far as I know) turns off the Power!
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  • DanielDorb
    At WholeFoodsMarket in the Florida Region we focus on "GREEN MISSION". Our last mission was to cut 8 hours of PC usage by building a script to shut down the pc's in our region from an instore server.. That is 650 pc's if you cut the 8 hours a day you can save $150. per pc a year. so intern 650x $150, you can save $97,000+ a year with this many pc's running. In order to be successful you must: 1. Communicate with your EU to save all of there work. 2. Plan patching when systems are turned on using WSUS. 3. Do not rely on EU to shut down have the script do it for them. 4. Automate defrags and discleanups with tools. Any thoughts?
    25 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Kevin Beaver
    Regarding DanielDorb's comments, patching and defragging are going to affect productivity...and so is waiting for the computer to boot each day. Granted boot times have gotten better in Vista. Whatever happened to standy and hibernate? I do that with my computers all the time and you get the best of both worlds.
    16,905 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Rvanlaeys
    There's a real easy solution to this. Just go with a solution like www.greenshutdown.com. It's saved us over 50K last year and we only have 1300 computers.
    10 pointsBadges:
    report

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