What’s the best language for developing GUI apps?

435 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
Java
Programming Languages
RPG
An IBM iSeries user recently wrote the editors of Search400.com asking about the best programming language for developing GUI applications. Currently they run only RPG-based green-screen programs on their iSeries, but they are looking to move into the GUI realm. For now, it will be limited to new applications. All of their users connect via a LAN, most using a Windows Terminal Server desktop. In addition to RPG, they also have some Visual Basic and limited Java experience. What, in your opinion, would be the best language for them to use and why? -- Michelle Davidson, editor, Search400.com

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

IBM has some utility called “web facing” to add GUI to existing programs. I think that it use Internet explorer for interface, I’m not sure?
Hope I did help a little?

For new programs, depends on actually experience of programmers.

Discuss This Question: 5  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • FerencMantfeld
    Dear Michelle That depends on a number of factors, but mostly one's knowledge and experience with a particular platform. the Micro-smurfs will swear by Visual Basic, others again by Delphi. A decade ago it was PowerBuilder. The world has embraced Java (Sun Java) and J2EE as the leading platform, and these days, if you're not talking Java, Web interface and XML, you're not thinking longer term (what is long term these day ? who knows ?) Java is now only a decade old but VERY powerful. the beauty of course is full transporatbility across any environment and integration-ability into almost any modern application. Flash is also a very popular front-end platform, but not nearly as powerful as Java. Another consideration is code reverse engineering. Java without obfuscation is reverse-engineerable, but of course this is not pretty. LAN / WAN latency is another thing to take into account. Will the application be running in a closed-loop LAN or will it face the internet or WAN ? If so, the front end had better be light, otherwise the network admin guys are going to hate you first, followed by your users who will perceive your application to be cludgey and s - l - o - w. Gettin off my soapbox now. Regards: Ferenc PS. I am sure others will have more words of insight on things I have probably not even considered.
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Avinashjham
    You might want to try what we have tried successfully. We are having RPG/400 as our core comptency but this did not allow us to take our applications to a GUI level. We experimented with VisualAge RPG/400. We found that this had the shortest learning curve since the CODE Base is almost 95% identical to RPG/400. We infact even copied code from our RPG/400 (PDM) into the VARPG/400 (WDT) on many occassions. We have now successfully written 20 programs in VARPG so far without purchasing a single book on VARPG or attending any instructor-led training. The IBM documentation and the existing skills of RPG were sufficient to overcome the learning curve. Now the interesting thing about VARPG is that it allows you to compile to the program as a Visual Basic kind of application that you will need to INSTALL on the Client PC. Alternatively, you can also compile your VARPG source code to a JAVA program or applet. Of course doing so does not allow you to get all the advantages of writing in pure Java, but spares you a longer learning curve of Java and more importantly, --> you get a Java Applet that you can put on any website! This strategy ends up looking better than CUI since its GUI-based, savvy and also spares installation from PC to PC type for the VARPG client software. What's more ... you would have used your proven RPG knowledge to get a Java program without knowing a single line of Java. Final word is that if you can afford the learning curve of Java and change your enterprise's architectural roadmap to include Java to be your mainstream development language, that is excellent. If not then consider VARPG. It is very easy. Whichever way you go, I wish you all the best.
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • RSILVA
    Just as an additional information, there is a open source package called CGIDEV2 which allows easy development of CGI interfaces with RPG. http://www-922.ibm.com/en? http://www.easy400.net/en
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Fanbot
    Good morning, our company is making full use of IBM's Web Facing Tool. This allows us to use existing code (RPG3,4 and free ) with only the DDS screens being mapped. There are some draw backs, but this relates to the Limit Capabilities parameter of the user profile. So far our users have responded well to the GUI interfaces. Regards
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Cpujbl
    IBM currently has a product called Websphere which will build GUI screens over existing RPG green screens. We actually use a product called JWalk developed by Seagull which also allows us to put a GUI look on top of our existing green screen. JWalk has a scripting language that allows us to do 99% of what we want to do. The learning curve isn't too big and it allowed our RPG programmers to remain RPG programmers and gives our client's the ability to remain green or choose GUI depending on the needs of the user within the office. We have been doing this for about 6 years now.
    0 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following