What’s the best certification for a networking career after the CCNA?

1545 pts.
Tags:
CCIE
CCNP
MCSE CCNA
Networking
Networking certifications
Networking professionals
RHCE
I am a final year student in electrical engineering. I am now working on completing my certification in CCNA. What else is needed for a profession in networking? Should I go for the CCNP and CCIE, MCSE, or RHCE? Please let me know the best way to move towards a networking profession. What should be my first step?

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

Dear

If you want to work in Local Area Network & You should choose MCSE but if you want to work in Wide Area Network You should go to firstly CCSP then CCIE.

If you are preparing for CCNA certification exam. You should choose CCNA and then go to CCIE. It is a best for you

Thanks

All the above said domains have their own value, nothing is bad, You gotta select based on your interest.

I am a Cisco Instructor and might be able to offer a little insight. The CCNA is an excellent foundational certification. Cisco has provided several different CCNP or Professional level certifications. It used to be simply CCNA -> CCNP -> CCIE. Now, depending on your area of interest there are several “CCNP” level certs you can choose from. For example, if your interests run toward security you can get the Cisco CCSP which focuses on that. If you want to work in an ISP you can get the CCIP which focues on ISIS, BGP, etc. If you are more interested in Voice over IP there is the CCVP for that. In addition there is a CCDP for people interested in design more than implementation. The original CCNP is a basic advanced networking cert. None of these certs are easy and require passing 4 or 5 seperate tests each of which is associated with a class that you may or may not want to take. Good luck and feel free to email me if you need any help. – Brent Mossberger (bmossberger@gmail.com)

Discuss This Question: 4  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • NetworkingATE
    [...] Here is the original post:  What’s the best certification for a networking career after the CCNA? [...]
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • BlankReg
    MCSE is useful to round out the knowledge, but most places I have worked (over many years) I have not really needed that sort of in depth knowledge. If your interest is more in the systems side, then go down that route. It is a massive jump from CCNA to CCIE, too big for many to make in one go. so I disagree with Hemanthdns on the steps. If you interest is in networks, wide-area or LAN, then look to the CCNP, or the specialisations from Cisco, after you complete the CCNA. Once you have the CCNP, then you can further the knowledge, with moving on to the CCIE, as you will then have a knowledge of the routing and switching technologies, or you could look to Security, with the specialisations, towards the CCSP, VoIP again with specialisations towards the CCVP, or design with the CCDA and CCDP. The bottom line is that there is no best certification, it depends on your interests, and the demand for certifications in your area. Certifications are only part of the equation, experience gained is almost as valuable. So try to find a job first and then look to do more certifications, your new company may even pay for them :-)
    12,325 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Kevin Beaver
    Focus less on certification on more on developing your real-world skills (technical, communication, etc.). I've written several pieces on the subject of IT careers including networking (with people, not Ethernet), building credibility, politics, certifications, etc. you may want to check out. Most importantly you need to understand what you like to do and what you're good at and then set out to do it. Best of luck!!
    16,640 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Ed Tittel
    I'd agree that continuing in the Cisco vein has merit, but which way you choose to go depends on your work interests and future employment goals. Cisco offers distinct tracks in Security, VoIP, network design, storage, and a whole bunch more. You can now earn a specialized CCNA in Security, Voice and Wireless, above and beyond the basic CCNA credential. After that comes a Cisco professional credential (CCNP for networking operations, CCDP for networking design, CCSP for security, CCIP for infrastructure/provider stuff, CCVP for voice, and CCNP Wireless for wireless networking). The same thing is true for CCIE: outside routing and switching, you can earn that credential in design, security, service provider, storage networking, voice, and also wireless. Here's my recommendation: get your CCNA and get into the workforce. After you have some time on the job, you will start to get a better idea of where your interests will take you (and if you want to continue down the Cisco road, or perhaps move into a Microsoft or other OS-specific area of learning instead, as other posters have suggested). If you let your interests and opportunities guide your choices, you'll probably be happier with the results than if you simply try to guess which way to go and hope for the best. It may take a bit longer to arrive at a career path, but part of the process is to enjoy and learn along the way, so perhaps taking more time is a good thing. Best of luck in your career planning decisions. --Ed--
    4,465 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following