what title is given to someone who has completed ccna?????

60 pts.
Tags:
Career Development
CCNA
Certifications
Network Engineers
i've completed a diploma in computer applications plus ccna when applying for job would it be right to say im a network engineer???

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Congratulations! I think you are learning that there is still a lot to learn. Keep up the good work.

CCNA – Cisco Certified Network Associate I would say this is a Network Administrator title – not a Network Engineer.

CCNP – Cisco Certified Network Professional – this is a certification which would be equivalent to a Network Engineer.

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  • mshen
    I never thought of certifications giving you a title. To me titles are what you do as a job, but certifications are credentials which act as a form of proof of your abilities.
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  • CRagsdale32
    technically speaking, once you have passed the CCNA, CCNP or CCIE tests for example, on your resume it isn't inappropriate to include that in your title. such as: John T Technology, ccna. Cisco also offers icons that can be included in the ofrm of clip art logos and such for your resume and business cards.
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  • Ed Tittel
    When you earn the CCNA you get to call yourself a CCNA as long as that credential remains current and valid. There is no equivalence in CCNA to "network engineer" as other posters have observed. I'd be careful about using the term "engineer" in a job title, in fact: here in my home state of Texas, for example, it's illegal for a person to use a job title that includes the word engineer unless that person has earned the Professional Engineer (PE) credential by meeting its stringent work experience (5+ years in the field) and examination (very difficult test that covers all of the major engineering disciplines). Check with your local authorities first, unless you are indeed a PE. --Ed--
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  • Sixball
    and the converse of what Ed wrote: ive seen multiple organizations that use "network engineer" "network technician" and "network analyst" rather inter-changeably. "
    But, more directly, getting a cert doesnt necessarily give you a "title", which can be arbitrary anyhow
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