What should we do as AS/400 Programmer?

30 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
Career Development
I'm AS/400 programmer for years. As we know AS/400 market is shrinking. I plan to learn new technology. but I don't know much more other programming language. Could anyone please suggest which should I learn to integrate with my RPG programming skills? PHP or Java? or others ?

Software/Hardware used:
as400

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Are you willing to relocate? There are AS400 jobs out there if you want them. If you do not want to move, what skills are required in the area that you live?

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  • TomLiotta
    Nobody knows what you should do. Studying additional technologies is always a good idea, and PHP and Java are both good choices. -- Tom
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  • philpl1jb
    What options to move into a project, etc. are there with your employer?  Previous employers?  Network of people?
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  • jinteik
    actually in the final day, you need to actually plan out your future and know where you want to head and we cannot tell you to stay on as400, pick up php or java..we only can advice and the choice is back in your hands
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  • philpl1jb
    Talk to head-hunters in your area find out what's hot.  What jobs they can not find enough workers for.   The most important skills are design and problem solving - you're good at those.  You just need to develop a new model around your skills.
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  • James Murray
    As I talk to my students, I am often asked the same question.  What is the next big thing.  Nobody knows for sure... but the one thing we do know is that all technologies start small, get big and then go away.  So we have to keep re-inventing ourselves if we want to stay in this business.What I've found is that the "Hottest" technology may or may not (probably not) be what I really want to spend the next 5 - 10 years of my life doing.  Instead of looking at the next big language to develop in, look at where you want to be 10 years from now.  What type of position would you like to have?  coder, program manger, director, or ???Look up the job descriptions for those positions today.  What skills and experience do you need in those areas.  Also what technologies are coming up on the horizon that may be hot in the future?  Ask yourself at what point do I like to jump into technology (before anyone knows about it, when only a few people know about it but it's proven or after it's proven and everyone is jumping into it.)I personally think there are some very interesting areas to get into.  Unified Communication and Non-traditional user interfaces that don't require carrying a computer in the traditional sense... are two areas i'm personally interested in.I don't know how old you are, but by 2024 Moors law is predicted to reach it's limit.  Presently Chips are getting more powerful as we put use fewer and fewer molecules on a chip to create circuits.  By 2024 the circuites will be so small that the behaviour of the circuits will change from newtonian physics laws to quantum physics laws... This will have a dramatic affect on who will be in the drivers seat in developing software.What I'm saying is that you need to identify what you enjoy.  That requires work and research on your part.  Otherwise in a few more years you'll be on the site asking us again, what technology should I get into?
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  • ToddN2000
    Check out the jobs in your area on sites like Monster.com or the like and see what your market is like for the other languages. There are positions out there and some may even be within your own company. I made the change over 2 months ago from RPG on the i-Series to .NET and VB for the same company. It's been working out great. I like the new challenges it offers after 30 years in RPG. The farther you are willing to travel the more jobs available. My commutes have been between 20 and 50 miles, that's a lot of places to look into and pay can vary greatly depending on where. Just to the south om me the same position can pay 15 to 20 more.
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