What happened to IPv1, IPv2, IPv3, and IPv5?

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IPv1
IPv2
IPv3
IPv4
IPv5
IPv6
WAN
I hear a lot about IPv4 and IPv6, but what happened to IPv1, IPv2, IPv3, and IPv5?
ASKED: December 15, 2010  6:08 PM
UPDATED: April 18, 2013  5:49 PM

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I would assume there were problems found with those implementations and they were scrapped before becoming ratified.

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  • Guardian
    Yes i think it was to do with the procedures and standards most they could have had issues but not sure. Good question though....
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  • Teicneoir
    IPv1, 2, & 3 would actually be part of the TCP/IP protocols, of which there were 3 versions. IPv4 is were they split the 2 in to separate protocols and created an updated IP protocol. IPv5 is an experimental TCP/IP protocol called the Internet Stream Protocol that never really went anywhere. So they skipped 5 and went to IPv6. If you want to know more - http://www.tcpipguide.com/toc.htm
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  • SearchEnterpriseWAN
    [...] Wondering what happened to IPv1, IPv2, IPv3, and IPv5? Search Enterprise informs us why IPv4 and IPv6 have taken the stage in front of the [...]
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