What are your thoughts on the NSA and Snowden?

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Data security breaches
online privacy
social media
It seems everyone on social media has an opinion about the NSA, Edward Snowden and the attempts to have him extradited. The Snowden saga will likely continue as the world debates questions of online privacy vs. security, as well as the rights of people who leak government information. What do you think of NSA's PRISM program controversy and U.S. efforts to apprehend Edward Snowden?

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  • bookprinting
    We all know Edward Snowden is one hero! He let us know the truth, and give us the knowledge that we are living under imoral monitoring.
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  • CarlCioffi
    Edward Snowden is an idiot and so is anybody who didn't think the gov't has been spying on them for years. Countries have been spying on each other forever and will continue to do so inspite of boneheads like Snowden. All he did was seal his future. They will catch him eventually and he will either spend the rest of his life in a federal prison or meet his demise in a mysterious accident. You have a better chance of winning the lottery then ever telling your gov't what they can and can't do.
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  • Ben Rubenstein
    Since I know the NSA is reading this, I should say that I condemn him, right?

    Overall, I'm not sure that Snowden accomplished what he set out to (or if he even knew what he was setting out to do), and it's not exactly a revelation that the government might have access to a lot of 'private' info. But I am glad there's some conversation happening around what is happening and why. It's hard to know where to strike the balance between privacy and security, but shouldn't we be part of making that call?
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  • CarlCioffi
    Yes we should be part of it but I don't see that happening before the next revolution. We have no control and no say over what our gov't does or does not do. We lost then when we started electing millionaires whose only agenda is to help themselves and their cronies. There should be term limits but unfortunately they are the ones making the rules. It's a "Catch-22". Now if the North Koreans nuked DC while they were in full session we might be able to get somewhere, fortunately their nukes can only reach half way to the US, how pathetic.
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  • TomLiotta
    ...an idiot ... is anybody who didn’t think the gov’t has been spying on them for years.
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    And:
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    Since I know the NSA is reading this...
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    Both of of those (and many other statements here and elsewhere) imply that it's common knowledge how much information is intercepted in communications networks and routed to government repositories. Past releases of data about the collection has caused many of us to extrapolate to conclude that far more is being collected than government agencies admit to. The fact that specific questionable areas were locked away under 'national security' gag rules only helped to further the general understanding that nothing was sacrosanct once entered into any general network.
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    All of that is making me wonder exactly what was revealed in the information that was leaked by Snowden that was actually 'secret'.
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    Is the 'secret' only that it was happening? Were significant technical details disclosed that would allow someone to use the networks without being detected?
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    How does any of the leaked information put 'national security' at risk? Why was it classified as a significant 'secret' in the first place? IMO, that gets to the heart of all of it.
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    There is some driving motivation for doing very questionable stuff while hiding it behind 'national security'. None of what was released seems appropriate for such a label... unless it was believed not to be in the best interest of the country. Then it makes sense to me that hiding it would be desired by those who do it.
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    Tom
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  • CarlCioffi

    I have always assumed that nothing is sacred once entered into a public network and I do believe our gov't collects more data than they are admitting.  I also believe they probably have way more data than they know what to do with.  After all we are talking about gov't employees the majority of which got a job because of who they know not what they know.  I thought it was ironic that there was an advertisement for jobs at the NSA posted on the comcast site in the midst of all this BS.

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